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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Netherland. (search)
to raise volunteers to make war against the Dutch on their own account. At another meeting (September, 1653) the commissioners, believing they were called by God to make present war on Ninegret, ordered 250 men to be raised for that purpose. The Massachusetts court again interfered, and prevented war. Cromwell, however, sent three ships and a few troops to attack New Netherland, but before they reached America the war with Holland was over, and the expedition, under John Leverett and Robert Sedgwick, proceeded to capture Acadia (q. v.) from La Tour, who laid claim to it because of a grant made to his father by Sir William Alexander. Late in August, 1664, a land and naval armament, commanded by Col. Richard Nicolls, anchored in New Utrecht Bay, just inside of the present Coney Island There Nicolls was joined by Governor Winthrop, of Connecticut, several magistrates of that colony, and two leading men from Boston. Governor Stuyvesant was at Fort Orange (Albany) when news of this
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Orders in council. (search)
ted in and out of Congress by debates and discussions, and while these were in progress the feeling against the British was intensified by the publication in New York papers of what purported to be a speech of Lord Dorchester to a certain Indian deputation from a late general council at the Maumee Rapids, in which he suggested the probability of a speedy rupture between the United States and Great Britain. The British order and Dorchester's speech caused resolutions to be introduced by Sedgwick, March 12, 1794, into the House of Representatives for raising fifteen regiments of 1,000 men each, for two years, and the passage of a joint resolution, March 26, laying an embargo for thirty days, afterwards extended thirty days longer, having in view the obstructing of the supply of provisions to the British fleet and army in the West Indies. Sedgwvick's resolutions were rejected, but a substitute was passed suggesting a draft of militia. It was proposed to detach from this body 80,000
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Presidential administrations. (search)
Jefferson, State; Hamilton, Treasury; Knox, War; Edmund Randolph, Attorney-General. Congress, Federalist; Muhlenberg and Trumbull speakers. 1793-97: Washington and Adams again; Jefferson, then Randolph, State; Hamilton, then Wolcott, Treasury; other minor changes. Congress, 1793-95, Republican House; Muhlenberg, speaker; 1795-97, Dayton, speaker. 1797-1801: Adams, Federalist; Jefferson, Vice-President, Republican; Pickering, State; Wolcott, Treasury. Congress, Federalist; Dayton and Sedgwick, speakers. 1801-5: Jefferson; Burr, Vice-Presi- dent, Republican; Madison, State; Gallatin, Treasury. Congress, Republican; Macon, speaker. 1805-9: Jefferson; George Clinton, Vice-President, Republican; Madison, State; Gallatin, Treasury. Congress, Republican; Macon and Varnum, speakers. 1809-3; Madison; Clinton, Vice-President, Republican; Robert Smith, later Monroe, State; Gallatin, Treasury. Congress, Republican; Varnum and Clay, speakers. 1813-17: Madison; Gerry, Vice-Pre
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rappahannock Station, battle of. (search)
Rappahannock Station, battle of. In the pursuit of Lee, in his retreat towards Richmond from the vicinity of Bull Run, in October, 1863, the 6th Corps, under General Sedgwick, found the Confederates strongly intrenched in works cast up by the Nationals on the north side of the Rappahannock, at Rappahannock Station. They were about 2,000 in number. Sedgwick advanced (Nov. 7, 1863) upon each flank of the works, with the division of Gen. D. A. Russell marching upon the centre. The first bSedgwick advanced (Nov. 7, 1863) upon each flank of the works, with the division of Gen. D. A. Russell marching upon the centre. The first brigade, under Col. P. C. Ellmaker, was in the van of Russell's division, and just before sunset, in two columns, stormed the works with fixed bayonets. The van of the stormers rushed through a thick tempest of canister-shot and bullets, followed by the remainder of the brigade, and after a struggle of a few moments the strongest redoubt was carried. In that charge the slaughter of the Unionists was fearful. At the same time two regiments of Upton's brigade charged the rifle-pits, drove the Co
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Savage's Station, battle at (1862) (search)
een removed; and that the remainder, together with the mansion (his wife's property), were in flames. He immediately put in operation measures to overtake and destroy the retreating army. McClellan's rear-guard, composed of the divisions of Sedgwick, Richardson, Heintzelman, and Smith, of Franklin's corps, were at Savage's Station, under the general command of Sumner. There they were assailed by a Confederate force under Magruder, who first attacked Sedgwick at about 9 A. M. on June 29. HSedgwick at about 9 A. M. on June 29. He was easily repulsed. Supposing the Nationals to be advancing, he sent to Huger for aid; but finding they were only a covering party, these troops did not join him. By a misconception of an order the National line had been weakened, and at 4 P. M. Magruder fell upon the Unionists with much violence. He was again repulsed by the brigades of Burns, Brooke, and Hancock. The 69th New York and the batteries of Pettit, Osborn, and Bramhall then took an effective part in the action, and the battle
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sedgwick, Robert 1590-1656 (search)
Sedgwick, Robert 1590-1656 Military officer; born in England in 1590; was one of the first settlers of Charlestown, Mass. (1635); an enterprising merchant, and for many years a deputy in the General Assembly. Having been a member of an artillery company in London, he was one of the founders of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery of Boston, in 1638, and was its captain in 1640: In 1652 he was promoted to the highest military rank in the colony. In 1643 he was associated with John Winthrop, Jr., in the establishment of the first furnace and iron-works in America. In 1654, being in England, he was employed by Cromwell to expel the French from the Penobscot; and was engaged in the expedition of the English which took Jamaica from the Spaniards. He was soon afterwards promoted to major-general. He died in Jamaica, May 24, 1656.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and explorers, 1583-1763 (search)
University. The earliest adventurers. Captain John Smith. Newfoundland. William Vaughn. Robert Hayman. Robert Sedgwick. pamphlets of the land companies. narratives of Indian captivities. Mrs. Rowlandson. John Gyles. Jonathan Dickiand, and his Key into the languages of America was cast into shape while he was on his way from one to the other. Robert Sedgwick, one of the worthiest of those New Englanders who were recalled to serve the mother country, obtained a place for hithrough which he struggled in the Stygian quagmires of Thurloe's Collection of the State Papers from 1638 to 1661, found Sedgwick's letters of all others the best worth reading on this subject. Sedgwick was a prospering settler at Charlestown in MasSedgwick was a prospering settler at Charlestown in Massachusetts, speculating in land and customs duties, an organizer of the Ancient and Honourable Artillery Company, when his worldly career was diverted by a chance meeting with Cromwell. The Lord Protector recognized a man after his own model, and s
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. (search)
nd its setting contemporary, suffers, either as narrative or sense, from the same theological obsession, which appears in Judd's poems as little less than pathological. By 1851 there were, or had been, many novelists whose names could find place only in an extended account of American fiction See Northrup, C. S., The novelists, in A Manual of American Literature, ed. Stanton, T., 1909.: writers of adventure stories more sensational than Simms's or of moral stories more obvious than Miss Sedgwick's and Mrs. Child's, authors for children, authors preaching causes, authors celebrating fashionable or Bohemian life in New York. Not only regular novels and romances but briefer tales multiplied. The period which could boast in Cooper but one novelist of first rank could show three such tale-tellers as Irving, Hawthorne, and Poe. The annuals and magazines met the demand for such amusement and fostered it, See Book II, Chap. XX. but the novel was encouraged more than it was hurt by
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
choolcraft, H. R., 212 Schuyler, Philip, 259 Scots Proprietors, 5 Scott, Sir, Walter, 183, 241, 248, 255, 261, 282, 285, 292, 293, 295, 297, 300, 305, 306, 317 Scout, the, 315 Sea, the, 271 Sea Lions, the, 302 Seabury, Rev., Samuel, 136, 137 Sealsfield, Charles (Karl Post); 190, 212, 325 Seamstress of New York, the, 229 Seasonable thoughts on the state of religion in New England, 75 Seasons, 163 Secret journals, 144 n. Sedgwick, Miss C. M., 308, 310, 324 Sedgwick, Robert, 4 Seilhammer, G. O., 223 n. Select Charters, 125 n., 130 n., 134 n., 135 n., 141 n. Selected prose (N. P. Willis), 243 n. Self, 230 Self-Reliance, 336, 352 Sella, 263 n., 273, 281 Seneca, 116 Seneca Lake, 279 Sentiments of a British American, 127 Sertorius, the Roman patriot, 224 Seventy-six, 309 Sewall, Samuel, 48, 54 Shaftesbury, 93, 102, 109, I16 Shakespeare, 4, 12, 110, 112, 118, 211, 265 Sharpe, Colonel, 224 She would be a soldier, 220,
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11., Ye olde Meting-House of Meadford. (search)
ts name implied—a house for the town's people to meet in, not only for worship, but for the transaction of the town's business, which was done with a strict attention to the minutest details. Of the tax payers above mentioned but a part were church members. The term church was used by the fathers to designate the associated body of worshipers, and not the house they assembled in. Few roads there were in 1690, for few were needed. From Charlestown, through Mistick, or Meadford, came Robert Sedgwick, Edward Johnson, and four others through the farm of Zachariah Symmes, the minister of the Charlestown Church, to explore the territory to the north, located as Charlestown Village. The way they took was over the rocky hill, where had dwelt the Indian king Nanepashemit, and their route came to be known as the Oborn rode. At the top of the hill another road divides from this, the way to the Weare. It is appropriately called High street, and the hill is still known as Marm Simonds'.