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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 168 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 135 15 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 133 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 88 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 81 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 74 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 61 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Sedgwick or search for Sedgwick in all documents.

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Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 22: (search)
This startling intelligence, rendering our position now a very precarious one, was received by our Command-in-Chief with a quietude, and an absence of all emotion, which I could not but intensely admire. Referring, with the utmost calmness, to Sedgwick's advance, he quietly made his dispositions, ordering McLaws's division to march to the support of Early, who had been retreating to Salem Church--a place about five miles from Fredericksburg. By this firm and tranquil demeanour did General Leeoon we received cheerful news of the proceedings of McLaws and Early, who, attacking the enemy simultaneously, had succeeded in forcing them back upon Fredericksburg, retaking the heights, and finally, by a spirited attack, driving the whole of Sedgwick's corps to the other side of the river. Several ammunition and provision trains, besides prisoners, had fallen into our hands, and, but for the extreme caution of our generals, the whole of this portion of the hostile forces might have been ann