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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 168 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 135 15 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 133 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 88 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 81 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 74 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 61 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Sedgwick or search for Sedgwick in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
orps consisted of the divisions of Richardson, Sedgewick and French, mustering thirteen thousand six hundred and four men. He crossed at a ford below Pry's Mill, Sedgwick in front, then French, then Richardson. As soon as Sedgewick cleared the ford he moved his three brigades in parallel columns, heading straight for the east woos of Barksdale's brigade, and Anderson's brigade, of D. R. Jones's division, on his right, and Stafford and Grigsby on his left, crushed him with one blow, swept Sedgwick out of the west woods, and he lost 2,255 men in a moment. General Palfrey writes: The Confederate lines marched over them, driving them pell-mell straight throus, the Federal advance stopped. McClellan, meantime, had hurried Franklin's Sixth corps to the support of Sumner, but the latter, after the terrible disaster to Sedgwick, and the great loss to French and Richardson, was unwilling to risk another corps, because, as he said, a fresh body of troops was necessary to protect them from