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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
ounted orderly. Thereupon we speedily got on horseback, and first rode to General Sedgwick (familiarly called Uncle John ), to whom General Meade handed over the comng! we heard the cannon, in the direction of Rappahannock station. It was General Sedgwick attacking the enemy's works on this side of the river. We had not got a m therefore crossed at Kelly's Ford, so as to advance with undivided force; General Sedgwick, however, with nearly his whole corps, held the redoubt he had taken on th could you tell me where they are? Near Brandy Station we met good Uncle John Sedgwick, who said it was a cool day, as if there was nothing particular on hand, and h or bad roads, and could not effect a junction that evening. And so there was Sedgwick's Corps jammed up in the woods behind, and kept back also! So we pitched camp. If for no other reason, because it is hard to find anyone for the post. General Sedgwick would, I think, refuse; General Warren is very young, and is, besides, und
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
lso quite warm and red in the face, with hard riding and, probably, champagne. Then they said they would go over to General Sedgwick's, and General Humphreys asked if I would not go, too, which invitation it was not the thing to refuse; so I climbed 1864 General Humphreys sent for me and showed me a cipher correspondence between Butler and Halleck, and Halleck and Sedgwick. B. telegraphed that large reinforcements had been sent from the Rapid Ann to North Carolina, and that he wished a demoh. This morning we took an early breakfast, which, with the ready horses, quite reminded one of campaigning times. General Sedgwick was over, being in command, as viceroy. At 10.30 we began to hear the cannon, but General Humphreys would not stir,ody, while the whole camp was sending expeditions to the four corners of the compass! On Saturday, at early morn, Uncle John Sedgwick suddenly picked up his little traps and marched with his Corps through Culpeper and out towards Madison Court Hous
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
firm, and never budged; but for a time there were all sorts of rumors, including one that Generals Sedgwick and Wright were captured. In a great hurry the Pennsylvania Reserves were sent to the resown the Spotsylvania and Fredericksburg road to the Gate, thus approaching on the extreme left; Sedgwick and Warren respectively occupied the left and right centre, while Hancock, in the neighborhood was. I said, What is the matter? He seemed entirely unnerved as he replied: They have hit General Sedgwick just here under the eye, and, my God, I am afraid he is killed! It was even so: General SeGeneral Sedgwick, with a carelessness of consequences for which he was well known, had put his Headquarters close on the line of battle and in range of the sharpshooters. As he sat there, he noticed a soldier ord, he fell, shot through the brain by a ball from a telescopic rifle. . . . The dismay of General Sedgwick's Staff was a personal feeling; he was like a kind father to them, and they loved him reall
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
he night to get in their comrades, and those who were not thus reached usually had their sufferings shortened by some stray ball, among the showers that continually passed between the works. We here found the body of Colonel McMahon, brother of Sedgwick's Adjutant-General. He was wounded and sat down by a tree, where he was soon hit by two or three other bullets. . . . Some extraordinary scenes occurred during the armistice. Round one grave, where ten men were laid, there was a great crowd ofmanna Ford, and watching the 5th and 6th Corps as they marched up from the pontoon bridges; and I remember thinking how strange it would be if each man who was destined to fall in the campaign had some large badge on! There would have been Generals Sedgwick, Wadsworth, and Rice, and what crowds of subordinate officers and of privates, all marching gaily along, unconscious, happily, of their fate. July 1, 1864 Nothing very new to-day. I took advantage of the propinquity of the nigger divis
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
etty, scheming political officer; he sends letters to newspapers and despatches to Mr. Stanton about the enthusiasm for Lincoln in the army, etc., etc. Nothing is said to him; that is all right; he has an opinion, as he ought to have. But there is Lieutenant-Colonel McMahon, lately Adjutant-General of the 6th Corps, an excellent soldier, whose brother fell at the head of a charge at Cool Arbor, and who himself had been in all the battles: he is a McClellan man, as was natural in one of General Sedgwick's Staff. He talks very openly and strongly about his side, as he has a right to do. What is the consequence? He is, without any warning, mustered out of the service! That is to say, a soldier who don't agree with the Administration must be got rid of; it is nothing in his favor that he has exposed his life in twenty different actions. You would scarcely credit the number of such cases as this, cases of petty spite, fitting rather to a bad-tempered child than to a great and dignified
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
84, 164. Rush's Lancers, 130. Russell, David Allen, 128, 144, 177. Russell, Elizabeth, III. Russell, George Robert, III. Russell, Henry Sturgis, 161, 164, 165, 269. Russians on horse, 61. Sailor's Run, 351. Salient, taking of the, 110; map, 113. Sanders, William Wilkins, 163, 177, 199. Sanford, Charles W., 255. Sanford, Henry Shelton, 262. Sanitaries, 135, 182, 183. Satterthwait, —, 291. Schack, George von, 322. Schuyler, Philip, 292. Sedgwick, Arthur, 224. Sedgwick, John, 60, 66, 98, 106, 180; in command, 36; at Kelly's Ford, 43, 44, 45; on Butler's demonstration, 68, 69; marches, 77; death of, 107. Sentry, a patriotic, 206. Sergeant, William, 295. Seward, William Henry, 259. Seymour, Truman, 98, 299. Shaler, Alexander, 98. Shaw, Robert Gould, 257; death of, 1. Shaw, —, 134, 250, 285; described, 191. Shells, behavior of mortar, 261, 270. Sheridan, Philip, 136, 300, 332, 347; chief of cavalry, 81; described, 82, 327; Meade and, 105n,