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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 12 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Alexander A. Semmes or search for Alexander A. Semmes in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
he defence of their country's rights and honor. They gave such a guarantee, by their matchless adaptation to the rules and Lieutenant (afterwards Commodore) A. A. Semmes. regulations of the Navy, of their ability to learn the science of war from officers edu cated for the naval service, that the country must not forget, while a were not always so fortunate. On the 16th of October an expedition was fitted out to destroy two blockade-running steamers in Hillsboro River. Lieutenant-Commander A. A. Semmes, in the gun-boat Tahoma (assisted by the Adela), was directed to divert attention from the expedition by shelling the town and fort and to land men umm, C. R. Fleming, F. E. Ford and G. B. Sidell; Engineers, Henry Snyder, W. H. Harris, F. G. Coggin and G. J. Lamberson. Steam gun-boat Tahoma Lieutenant-Commander, A. A. Semmes; Assistant Surgeon, J. H. Gunning; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Wm. Hennesy; Acting-Ensigns, W. H. Harrison, D. W. Jackson and J. C. Hamlin; Acting-M
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
soon driven away and the vessels suffered little damage. The officers particularly commended by Rear-Admiral Dahlgren were: Captain D. B. Ridgely, Commander F. Stanly, Commander G. B. Balch, Lieutenant-Commander T. S. Fillebrown, Lieutenant-Commander A. A. Semmes, Lieutenant-Commander A. W. Johnson, Lieutenant-Commander S. B. Luce, Acting-Master W. H. Mallard and Acting-Master G. W. Parker At the fall of Charleston the following Confederate vessels fell into the hands of the Navy: Iron-clg; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. W. Sherfy; Engineers: Second-Assistants, Francis Cronin, Cipriano Andrade and H. F. Bradford; Third-Assistants, C. F. Uber and J. G. Littig; Acting-Gunner, Chas. F. Adams. Lehigh--Fourth-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, Alex. A. Semmes; Lieutenant, John H. Reed; Acting-Masters, W. N. Price and John H. Bolles; Acting-Ensigns, D. W. Hodson, J. H. Cromwell and Rich. Lanphier; Assistant-Surgeon, David V. Whitney; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. F. A. Torbert; Enginee
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
re were secured later. This was hard on the shippers; but such are the fortunes of war, and it was the only way to cripple the resources of the Confederacy. Captain Semmes, of Alabama fame, railed at Union naval officers a great deal for what he called their greedy spirit in capturing cotton coming out and arms going in, which hhan parading the deck and following the routine of a regular man-of-war. They were a tough, brave set of men, full of resources and worthy of every trust. Captain Semmes, of the Alabama. in his journal of that vessel's cruise, berates the volunteer officers of the Federal Navy, and calls them a low-lived set of fellows; but ih gunners that are said to have joined the Alabama from the English naval gunnery training-ship, the Excellent. In this, perhaps, can be found the reason why Captain Semmes did not approve of them. Joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. After the capture of Wilmington, Commodore James