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Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for O. J. Semmes or search for O. J. Semmes in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official reports of actions with Federal gunboats, Ironclads and vessels of the U. S. Navy, during the war between the States, by officers of field Artillery P. A. C. S. (search)
the four gunboats of the enemy then approaching, engaging three boats following each other in succession, for about thirty minutes, under a severe fire from their heavy guns, at short range and unsupported, but in battery with a section of Capt. O. J. Semmes's battery, consisting of two James Rifles (bronze twelve-pounders), under First Lieut. J. A. A. West. Both sections then fell back to the Bayou Teche road, in the rear of and above their first position, where after firing ten to fifteen mio the marsh on the left bank of the Teche, made his way to Berwick's Bay and reported the loss of the boat. The Diana was repaired and was posted in the centre of the Confederate line at the battle of Bisland, April 12th and 13th, 1863. Captain O. J. Semmes, of the field artillery, was detached from his battery and placed in command of her for the occasion, fighting her with his characteristic gallantry. She was disabled by the fire of the three or four Federal gunboats in the bayou in the r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
under instructions early in April, with a credit of 10,000 (!) from Mr. Memminger. The appointment proved a happy one; for he succeeded, with a very little money, in buying a good supply, and in running the Ordnance Department into debt for nearly half a million sterling—the very best proof of his fitness for his place, and of a financial ability which supplemented the narrowness of Mr. Memminger's purse. Before this, and immediately upon the formation of the Confederate Government, Admiral Semmes had been sent to the North by President Davis as purchasing agent of arms and other ordnance stores, and succeeded in making contracts for, and purchases of, powder, percussion caps, cap machinery (never delivered), revolvers, &c. He also procured drawings for a bullet-pressing machine, and other valuable information. The sets of machinery for making the rifle with sword bayonet, and the rifle-musket model of 1855, had been seized at Harper's Ferry by the State of Virginia. That for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Arsenals, workshops, foundries, etc. (search)
under instructions early in April, with a credit of 10,000 (!) from Mr. Memminger. The appointment proved a happy one; for he succeeded, with a very little money, in buying a good supply, and in running the Ordnance Department into debt for nearly half a million sterling—the very best proof of his fitness for his place, and of a financial ability which supplemented the narrowness of Mr. Memminger's purse. Before this, and immediately upon the formation of the Confederate Government, Admiral Semmes had been sent to the North by President Davis as purchasing agent of arms and other ordnance stores, and succeeded in making contracts for, and purchases of, powder, percussion caps, cap machinery (never delivered), revolvers, &c. He also procured drawings for a bullet-pressing machine, and other valuable information. The sets of machinery for making the rifle with sword bayonet, and the rifle-musket model of 1855, had been seized at Harper's Ferry by the State of Virginia. That for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
ee hours struggle that the two divisions were enabled to drive the dismounted cavalry and Mahone's small brigade, and then only because they were out of ammunition. Munford's entire force did not exceed a thousand men. Stuart reports that General Semmes, who held a gap next below (probably a mile off), rendered no assistance of any kind. General Howell Cobb, who had been loitering for hours on the other side of the pass, at last arrived with two regiments, and requested Munford to post themt of the woods, and, notwithstanding my efforts to do so, I did not suceeed in stopping it until its flank and rear had become exposed to the fire of the column on the left; i.e., Sedgewick's men. He withdrew it, reformed it, and, being joined by Semmes's brigade, two regiments of Barksdale's brigade, and Anderson's brigade, of D. R. Jones's division, on his right, and Stafford and Grigsby on his left, crushed him with one blow, swept Sedgwick out of the west woods, and he lost 2,255 men in a mo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A sketch of Debray's Twenty-Sixth regiment of Texas cavalry. (search)
ents. A shelling was opened and kept up for six hours, to which the garrison, having no artillery to reply, had to submit good humoredly. Strange as it may appear, although the Federals covered the whole city with their shells and solid shot, some of which reached the bay, there was no loss of life, and the injury to houses was trifling. It will be remembered that, in the evening after the shelling, flashes of light were seen and a rumbling noise resembling broadsides was heard from a distance westward; then, after a few minutes, darkness and silince prevailed again. Many were the surmises upon this incident and several weeks intervened before the sinking of the Federal ship Hatteras by Captain Semmes, off Saint Louis Pass, became known on the island. For nine months all was quiet in Texas. The defenses of Galveston soon assumed shape, and Quaker guns frowning from the crests and casemates of the fort, held the Federals in check until real artillery could be placed in battery.