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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 148 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 53 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 35 3 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 28 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 21 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Paul J. Semmes or search for Paul J. Semmes in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., New Orleans before the capture. (search)
New Orleans before the capture. George W. Cable, Co. 1, 4th Mississippi Cavalry. The Confederate cruiser Sumter, Captain Semmes, leaving New Orleans, June 18, 1861. from a sketch made at the time. In the spring of 1862, we boys of Race, Orange, Magazine, Camp, Constance, Annunciation, Prytania, and other streets had no game. Nothing was in ; none of the old playground sports that commonly fill the school-boy's calendar. We were even tired of drilling. Not one of us between seven and seventeen but could beat the drum, knew every bugle-call, and could go through the manual of arms and the facings like a drill-sergeant. We were blase old soldiers — military critics. Who could tell us anything? I recall but one trivial admission of ignorance on the part of any lad. On a certain day of grand review, when the city's entire defensive force was marching through Canal street, there came along, among the endless variety of good and bad uniforms, a stately body of tall, stalwart
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
onted by a line of redoubts before Williamsburg. The works consisted of a large fort (Magruder) at the junction of two roads running from Yorktown to Williamsburg, and small redoubts on each side of this, making an irregular chain of fortifications extending, with the creeks upon which they rested on either flank, across the peninsula. The Confederate brigades of The 61st New York regiment in camp at ship point, below Yorktown. [see map, P. 188.] from a War-time sketch. Kershaw and Semmes, of Magruder's command, occupied the works when Stoneman came in front of them, and, on finding his advance stubbornly opposed, Stoneman sent his cavalry upon reconnoissances over the field, and waited for the infantry under Hooker and Smith to come to his support. These divisions marched from Yorktown on parallel roads until Smith's column was halted by a burning bridge, and compelled to turn into the road by which Hooker was advancing. Sumner accompanied Smith's column, and, immediately
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
Brigade loss: w, 13. Hampton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Wade Hampton, (w): 14th Ga.; 19th Ga.; 16th N. C.; Hampton (S. C.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. M. W. Gary. Brigade loss: k, 45; w, 284=329. Hatton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert Hatton (k): 1st Tenn.; 7th Tenn.; 14th Tenn. Brigade loss: k, 44; w, 187; m, 13 = 244. Pettigrew's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. J. Pettigrew (w and c): Arkansas Battalion; 35th Ga.; 22d N. C.; 47th Va. Brigade loss: k, 47; w, 240; m, 54 == 341. The Official Records indicate that Semmes's and Griffith's brigades were in position for action, but were not actually engaged. The total loss of the Left Wing, as reported by General Smith, was 164 killed, 1010 wounded, and 109 missing = 1283. The aggregate Confederate loss on May 31st and June 1st was 980 killed, 4749 wounded, and 405 missing = 6134. Relative strength of the opposing forces. The following synopsis, from the Records and other data, is by General Gustavus W. Smith: The Union Army numbered 98,008, of whic
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
N. Couch. From a photograph. and sent to L. to send three brigades by the Nine-miles road, if they had not marched so far as to make the change involve a serious loss of time; this, after telling you of the misunderstanding. Your march from General Semmes's headquarters [he means the advance made by the division under Whiting, from the point where it was halted, near Old Tavern.--G. W. S.] was not in consequence of the letter from L. Whiting [Major] had gone at my request, with your permissionst, addressed to me by their immediate commander, General McLaws. He says: General Cobb, five regiments, [posted] from the Mechanicsville road to General Harvey's place; General Kershaw from General Harvey's to Baker's; Generals Griffith and Semmes from General Kershaw's right to New Bridge, and on the line down New Bridge road. Magruder's six brigades were the only forces guarding the crossings of the Chickahominy from New Bridge to Meadow Bridge. On the Federal side Keyes's corps,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
l. L. M. Lamar (w and c), Capt. George O. Dawson; 9th Ga., Col. R. A. Turnipseed; 11th Ga., Lieut.-Col. William Luffman. Brigade loss: k, 64; w, 327; m, 46 = 437. Artillery, Maj. John J. Garnett: Va. Battery (Wise Arty.), Capt. James S. Brown; S. C. Battery (Washington Arty.), Capt. James F. Hart; La. Battery (Madison Arty.), Capt. George V. Moody; Va. Battery, Capt. W. J. Dabney. Artillery loss; k, 3; w, 11==14. McLaws's division, Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Paul J. Semmes: 10th Ga., Col. Alfred Cumming (w), Capt. W. C. Holt; 53d Ga., Col. L. T. Doyal; 5th La., Col. T. G. Hunt; 10th La., Lieut.-Col. Eugene Waggaman (w and c); 15th Va., Col. T. P. August (w); 32d Va., Lieut.-Col. William R. Willis; N. C. Battery, Capt. Basil C. Manly. Brigade loss: k, 31; w, 121; m, 63==215. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C., Col. John D. Kennedy, Maj. F. Gaillard; 3d S. C., Colonel James D. Nance; 7th S. C., Col. D. Wyatt Aiken; 8th S. C., Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
n of the right flank of the army in its advance upon Richmond were put in my hands, beginning simultaneously with the march of the army from the Pamunkey. The army left its camp at White House Landing, on the Pamunkey, May 17th to 20th. The 6th Corps, under Franklin, advanced along the north bank of the Chickahominy, and on the 23d and 24th Davidson's brigade of Smith's division occupied Mechanicsville after a brief encounter with a Confederate column of Magruder's command, under General Paul J. Semmes.--Editors. Among these were the clearing of the enemy from the upper Peninsula as far as Hanover Court House or beyond, and, in case General McDowell's large forces, then at Fredericksburg, were not to join us, the destruction of railroad and other bridges over the South and Pamunkey rivers, in order to prevent the enemy in large force from getting into our rear from that direction, and in order, further, to cut the Virginia Central Railroad, the one great line of the enemy's communi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
ouac for May, 1887: The battle of Savage's Station, although a drawn fight as far as the possession of the field was concerned, was practically a victory for the Federals. Though their loss was three times as great as that of the Confederates, they accomplished the main purpose of the battle, which was to gain time for the passage of trains, artillery, and troops across White Oak Swamp. The Confederate force engaged in this fight was commanded by General J. B. Magruder, and consisted of Semmes's and Kershaw's brigades, Kemper's battery, and two regiments of Barksdale's brigade opposite our left. Cobb's division and two guns of Hart's battery were north of the railroad to the right of our line. Cobb's infantry was not engaged. About a half-hour after the fight was ended, I suggested to General Sumner that if he had no objection I would carry out the commanding general's orders, so far as I was concerned, and cross the White Oak Swamp with General Smith's division. We were the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
at the condition upon which the order was predicated was not fulfilled, and that I wanted instructions. He replied to advance when I heard the shouting. We did advance at the signal, and after an unassisted struggle for an hour and a half, and after meeting with some success, we were compelled to fall back under cover of the woods. Magruder advanced at the same signal, having portions of the divisions of Huger and McLaws, comprising the brigades of Mahone, Wright, Barksdale, Ransom, Cobb, Semmes, Kershaw, Armistead, and G. T. Anderson; but he met with some delay, and did not get in motion till he received a second order from General Lee, and we were then beaten. The Comte de Paris, who was on McClellan's staff, gives this account of the charge of my gallant division: Hill advanced alone against the Federal positions. . . . He had therefore before him Morell's right, Couch's division, reenforced by Caldwells brigade, . . and finally the left of Kearny. The woods skirting th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on Crampton's Gap and Antietam. (search)
d also posted the remainder of Mahone's brigade and the brigades of Semmes and Cobb of his own division within supporting distance, and ordere, who was wounded at Antietam, but the reports of Generals Cobb and Semmes and Colonel Munford sufficiently indicate the effect of our advance too late to change the result. One regiment, the 10th Georgia, of Semmes's brigade, also joined in Parham's defense, while the remaining thragainst greatly superior forces. The 10th Georgia regiment, of General Semmes's brigade, had been ordered to the gap from their position at te troops were unsuccessful. A battery going into action. General Semmes, who hurried forward to offer his assistance to General Cobb, t brigade, spoken of as heavy, are not reported; those in Cobb's and Semmes's brigades are given as 749. At the end of the fight, after nighd two guns of the latter, and the remnants of the brigades of Cobb, Semmes, Mahone, and Wilcox, which he afterward states were very small.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
fficer has not been found in the Official Records.--Editors. 24th Ga., Lieut.-Col. C. C. Sanders, Maj. R. E. McMillan; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion,----; 15th N. C., Lieut.-Col. William MacRae. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 76; w, 318, m, 452 = 846. Semmes's Brigade, Brig. Gen. Paul J. Semmes: 10th Ga., Maj. Willis C. Holt (w), Capt. P. H. Loud; 53d Ga., Lieut.-Col. Thomas Sloan (w), Capt. S. W. Marshborne; 15th Va., Capt. E. M. Morrison (w), Capt. Edward J. Willis; 32d Va., Col. E. B. Montague. BBrig. Gen. Paul J. Semmes: 10th Ga., Maj. Willis C. Holt (w), Capt. P. H. Loud; 53d Ga., Lieut.-Col. Thomas Sloan (w), Capt. S. W. Marshborne; 15th Va., Capt. E. M. Morrison (w), Capt. Edward J. Willis; 32d Va., Col. E. B. Montague. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 56; w, 274; m, 43 = 373. Barksdale's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Barksdale: 13th Miss., Lieut.-Col. Kennon McElroy (w); 17th Miss., Lieut.-Col. John C. Fiser; 18th Miss., Maj. J. C. Campbell (w), Lieut.-Col. William H. Leese; 21st Miss., Capt. John Sims, Col. Benjamin G. Humphreys. Brigade loss (in the campaign): 11, 35; w, 272; 11, 4 = 311. Artillery, Maj. S. P. Hamilton, Col. Henry C. Cabell: N. C. Battery, Capt. Basil C. Manly; Ga. Battery (Pulaski Art'y),
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