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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 707 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 112 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 89 1 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 87 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 73 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 67 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 44 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Raphael Semmes or search for Raphael Semmes in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fifth annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society, October 31st., 1877. (search)
th rapturous applause, and the thanks of the Society were warmly voted to the orator for his able and eloquent address, and a copy requested for publication. General Early paid a brief but touchinly-appropriate tribute to the memory of Admiral Raphael Semmes, late Vice-President of the Society for the State of Alabama, and, on motion of General Dabney H. Maury, the following minute was unanimously adopted: The death of Admiral Raphael Semmes, the Vice-President of this Society for the StatAdmiral Raphael Semmes, the Vice-President of this Society for the State ot Alabama, having occurred since the last annual meeting, the Sciety takes this occasion to express its high admiration for the exalted character, eminent abilities, and distinguished services ot the deceased, and its profoi)lnd regret for the loss the Society has sustained in his death; which is ordered to be entered on the Journal. Fifth annual report of the Executive Committee of the Southern Historical Society, for year Ending October 31st, 1877. General D. H. Maury then read the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
the failure of Early's attack. And further: In this engagement our loss in men and officers was large. Major-Generals Hood and Pender, Brigadier-Generals Jones, Semmes, G. T. Anderson, and Barksdale, and Col. Avery (commanding Hoke's brigade) were wounded, the last two mortally. Generals Pender and Semmes died after their removSemmes died after their removal to Virginia. In his Memorandum (August No., 1877, of the Southern Historical Society Papers), Colonel Walter H. Taylor, in speaking of the fight on the 3d of July, says: Had Hood and McLaws followed or supported Pickett, and Pettigrew and Anderson have been advanced, the design of the Comn manding-General would have been cartest. The troops engaged with me in the fight of the 2d were mostly Georgians, as follows: The four Georgia brigades of Generals Benning, Anderson, Wofford and Semmes, General Kershaw's South Carolina brigade, General Laws' Alabama brigade, General Barksdale's (afterward General Humphrey's) Mississippi brigade, and General Robe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The true story of the capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
ate naval history may serve to confirm them. The death of the illustrious author soon after it was written invests it with a painful interest: Letter from Admiral Semmes. Mobile, Alabama, August 13th, 1877. Major W. T. Walthall: Dear sir: You are quite right as to the locus in quo of the Shenandoah. She was either in have been consulted as to the whereabouts of the Shenandoah and the means of reaching her. Nothing of the kind transpired. I remain very truly yours, &c., Raphael Semmes. General Wilson continues: When Davis and his companions left Richmond in pursuance of this plan, they believed that Lee could avoid surrender only y are too manifold even for enumeration. Enough bas been said to show how utterly unworthy of credit is his evidence in support of any statement whatever. Admiral Semmes, in the letter above copied, has briefly noticed the falsity of the representation that President Davis had been preparing to leave the country, or had even e