Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Sergeant or search for Sergeant in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ate line, and reached the position assigned it at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Two of the batteries, Corput's and Carnes's, were ordered to the front at once, while the Third Maryland was held in reserve. In the struggle which ensued, the enemy was three times repulsed by Stevenson's division, losing a number of prisoners and the colors of three regiments. Their attack on the center was more successful, our troops at that point of the line giving way and retreating precipitately. The Orderly Sergeant of the Third Maryland, Johnny Hooper, who had been back with the wagons two miles in the rear, came up about dusk with the information that the center of the army was retreating, followed closely by the enemy, and that if we did not soon leave the field we should be captured. Nothing, of course, could be done without orders from General Stevenson, whose division was yet on the Ridge, fighting the enemy. About 7 P. M. he moved off the field, and sent orders to the Third Maryland to ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ate line, and reached the position assigned it at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Two of the batteries, Corput's and Carnes's, were ordered to the front at once, while the Third Maryland was held in reserve. In the struggle which ensued, the enemy was three times repulsed by Stevenson's division, losing a number of prisoners and the colors of three regiments. Their attack on the center was more successful, our troops at that point of the line giving way and retreating precipitately. The Orderly Sergeant of the Third Maryland, Johnny Hooper, who had been back with the wagons two miles in the rear, came up about dusk with the information that the center of the army was retreating, followed closely by the enemy, and that if we did not soon leave the field we should be captured. Nothing, of course, could be done without orders from General Stevenson, whose division was yet on the Ridge, fighting the enemy. About 7 P. M. he moved off the field, and sent orders to the Third Maryland to ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
hrough the right flare of the embrasure of the second gun, bursting the moment it cleared the parapet, and sending a fragment through the Captain's body. The same fragment also wounded private Early. Every effort was made to bring the Captain's body off the field. It was carried a short distance to the rear and an ambulance sent for, but its coming was prevented. Lieutenant Ritter secured a promise from Major Johnston that it should be taken to the field hospital, and instructed his Orderly Sergeant to see that it was done before he proceeded to the front to take command of the battery. The works were deep with mud, as it was raining, and the enemy's fire was unabated. At about 3 P. M., the left wing of the army was forced back, and the troops to the left of the position held by the Third Maryland, abandoned the line in disorder. So rapidly did they retreat, and so promply did the enemy follow, that the Lieutenant saw at once that there would be no chance to bring off his guns