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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 38 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 30 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 18 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 13 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 12 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Samuel E. Sewall or search for Samuel E. Sewall in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
terly meeting of the Mass. A. S. Society, in August, Mellen, in conjunction with S. S. Foster, attempted to embody this argument in a resolution, they were defeated (Lib. 11.139). It will be seen hereafter how the doctrine was forced upon the Third Party. So far, indeed, the Liberty Party might have gone, though not free, as being a party, to advocate disunion pure and simple. Towards this organization Mr. Garrison maintained a dignified attitude, not denying to his personal friends like Mr. Sewall, or to bitter enemies like Torrey, the moderate use Lib. 11.31, 38, 155, 159, 179. of his columns for Liberty Party notices and reports. He still held, with Channing, that, by such a conversion of Lib. 11.1. their anti-slavery energies, abolitionists would lose the reputation of honest enthusiasts, and come to be considered as hypocritical seekers after place and power. Practically, he viewed it as an attempt to make bricks without straw—to propel a locomotive engine without steam-to
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
y to learn the result of the trial. All hope that Latimer will be rescued. This was the first of the fugitive causes celebres which periodically produced tremendous excitement in the leading cities of the North, and, by contagion, throughout the country. George Latimer, a fine-looking man, almost white, had escaped with wife and child to Boston from Norfolk, Va. He was arrested without a warrant on a charge of theft. Brought before Judge Lemuel Shaw, on a writ of habeas corpus, with S. E. Sewall as one of his counsel, he was remanded to be tried before Judge Story, of the U. S. Circuit Court; Judge Shaw assenting to the doctrine of the Prigg case (ante, p. 59), and denying him a trial by jury. A public meeting was at once called in Faneuil Hall for Oct. 30 (to the great scandal of a portion of the clergy, because it was a Sunday evening—Lib. 12: 175). Prayers were asked on that day by Latimer, and were offered in some pulpits. The meeting was very turbulent, and Remond, attemp
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
r and the origin of the Liberator, of which he held up the tiny first number; paid by the way his never forgotten tribute to Benjamin Lundy; and gratefully acknowledged once more the indispensable pecuniary Ante, 1.223. support given him by Samuel E. Sewall and Ellis Gray Loring. To complete the retrospect, he read some of the menacing letters he had been accustomed to receive from the South, and confessed his early expectation of martyrdom in the cause, especially after the State of Georgia hor the rights of man over all the globe; pass, too, over Theodore Parker's eulogium, and the kindred strains Lib. 21.19. of many others, both clergymen and laymen. Charles List, A son-in-law of Nathan Winslow. His widow was re-married to S. E. Sewall. a Boston lawyer, Secretary of the Vigilance Committee, said: The history of liberty, as it will be read a thousand years Lib. 21.23. hence, has not been begun. Now I wish to ask for a contribution to this history which will be the mo
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
e and his infirmities and distance from the scene as an excuse for non-attendance. Moses Thacher wrote that he had in his possession the original draft of the Lib. 27.10. Address which he was commissioned to prepare for the Ante, 1.281. new-born Society. Samuel J. May, as he had been compelled in 1831 to leave Boston before the agreement to Ante, 1.278. form a society was reached, so now was drawn homeward Lib. 27.5. from the same city on the very eve of the festival. His cousin, Samuel E. Sewall, who, like himself, participated Ante, 1.277. in the first counsels from which the Society sprung, and whose importance to the anti-slavery agitation in its Ante, 1.223. infancy could hardly be overestimated, took his place upon the platform as one of the vice-presidents of the festival. The new chapter in the history of America which was Lib. 27.6. opened twenty-five years ago by the organization of the New England Anti-Slavery Society—may it soon be closed with the record of the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 19: John Brown.—1859. (search)
down of strongholds. But the professedly Christian church, with all Christendom, rejects our peaceful interpretation of Christianity, and has no right, therefore, to measure him by any higher standard than its own. He joined with the Executive Committee of the Lib. 29.174. American Anti-Slavery Society in recommending a wide-spread observance of December 2, the day on which John Brown was to be hung. At the solemn Boston meeting at Lib. 29.194. Tremont Temple, presided over by Samuel E. Sewall, he was greeted with great applause as he came forward to read Brown's address to the Court which had sentenced him to die for treason to Virginia. Every line of this address Mr. Garrison, both from principle and experience, was able to invest with a kindred feeling of moral elevation. In the first place, I deny everything but what I have all Lib. 29.175. along admitted—the design on my part to free the slaves. I intended, certainly, to have made a clean thing of that matter, as