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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 38 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 30 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 18 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 13 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Samuel E. Sewall or search for Samuel E. Sewall in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
iography of Dana, vol. i. p. 228. Early in April, 1851, Thomas Sims, another negro living in Boston, was brought before the same commissioner, claimed by a slaveholder from Georgia. The Administration at Washington, under Mr. Webster's lead, determined that this proceeding should not fail. The city marshal, acting under a formal order of Mayor Bigelow and the Board of Aldermen, in co-operation with the United States officers, surrounded the court house with chains. Sims's counsel, S. E. Sewall, R. Rantoul, Jr., C. G. Loring, and R. H. Dana, Jr., sought to secure the negro's liberty by writs of habeas corpus, bringing him before the Supreme Court of the State and the District and Circuit Courts of the United States, but without avail. The commissioner gave a certificate of rendition, and the negro was taken by three hundred armed policemen to Long Wharf, and put on board the brig Acorn, owned by John H. Pearson, a name already associated with a kidnapping case. Ante, p. 130. T
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
but most of whom had expected nothing from him but a radical and partisan course; and they were now surprised to find him beginning his public life in so sensible a way. He received approving letters from Caleb Cushing, N. P. Banks, Jr., Samuel E. Sewall, John Pierpont, Rev. Hubbard Winslow, Rev. Leonard Woods, Edward Austin, Samuel h. Walley, J. E. Worcester, George Livermore; and among letters from citizens of other States may be named those from Theodore Sedgwick and John Jay of New York,nals of Boston. The Free Soil organ, the Commonwealth, which was founded early in 1851, had a very uncertain and changeable management. At times Alley, Bird, Dr. Howe, and Joseph Lyman were pecuniarily interested in it, and for some months Samuel E. Sewall was the proprietor. Dr. Howe, Bird, Dr. Palfrey, Robert Carter, 1819-1879. Journalist and scholar, living in Cambridge, but afterwards removing to New York city. and Richard Hildreth the historian were at times contributors or editors; b
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
ons put by the committee,—contending that the Senate's jurisdiction in compelling witnesses to attend and testify was limited to certain well defined cases, and did not extend to inquiries which were merely in aid of legislation. March 12 and June 15, 1860. (Works, vol. IV. pp. 426-440.) The Republican senators were divided as to the question of the Senate's jurisdiction. Generally those from New England agreed with Sumner, but Fessenden disagreed with them; Seward (lid not vote. Samuel E. Sewall and John A. Andrew were Hyatt's counsel. Andrew testified before the committee, and his manly bearing attracted public attention. Later he commented on the action of the committee in its attempt to compel the attendance of Frank B. Sanborn as a witness. April 10, 13, and 16, 1860. Works, vol. IV. pp. 445-451. In his style of treating the Hyatt and Sanborn cases he showed his readiness to meet old antagonists. Mason, with characteristic assumption, took exception to his language a