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The Daily Dispatch: November 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
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two cases. Only about one-fourth of the British money, about £36,000,000, or about $180,000,000, was borrowed money. About £75,000,000 sterling was raised by taxation, and the rest was an unexpended balance of the preceding year. The Yankees, on the contrary, borrow every dollar they spend — They go the whole figure. They contract a loan for $700,000,000 at a dash, and agree to pay eight per cent for it. We have before expressed the opinion that this lavish expenditure was a part of Seward's policy, designed to make the Yankee cities feel the less the withdrawal of the Southern trade, by the introduction of these enormous sums, lavished among them for army and navy stores, and a general system of bribery. By this plan it is hoped to reconcile them to the war, and to employ the swarms of idle hands that would otherwise convert the cities into so many scenes of pillage and slaughter. How long this can last remains to be seen. That many thousands will become interested in the
eceived saying that three-decked men-of-war will be sent to Mexico. There was a surmise of ulterior demonstration The London Times editorially condemns Secretary Seward's dispatch to Lord Lyons, and maintains the right of foreign Governments to call attention to a constitutional provision. It also ridicules Mr. Seward's manMr. Seward's manifesto to the Governors of the States, relative to fortifications, &c. In another column the London Times exposes Lord I yon's bad grammar. It says the English side was argued exceedingly ill, and the American side with much ability; but the only result is to entirely convince it that in their own showing the acts of the Amecturing on the American Constitution and quietly enduring robbery and outrage, and says he will find he has drifted on to war. The London Post says that Secretary Seward has wantonly added another to the many differences which he wishes to perpetuate between the two countries. The London Daily News thinks the course purs
l effect upon the country that would be alike honored to Kentucky and beneficial to the nation. Distinguished visitors to Annapolis. A special train went to Annapolis this morning with a party of distinguished visitors, composed of Secretaries Seward, Cameron, and Smith; Assistant Secretaries T. A. Scott and Frederick A. Seward; Brigadier-General Van Vlitt, Governor Andrews and lady, and his aid, Colonel Richie and lady of Massachusetts, and Mr. Thayer, banker of Boston. They visited tFrederick A. Seward; Brigadier-General Van Vlitt, Governor Andrews and lady, and his aid, Colonel Richie and lady of Massachusetts, and Mr. Thayer, banker of Boston. They visited the Naval School, where the Secretary of War was received with the customary salute, and were complimented with a dress parade of the 23d Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, ordered by Colonel Morse, the Commandant of the post After dinner at the City Hall the party proceeded to General Burnside's camp of instruction, about a mile from the ancient city, where they witnessed a splendid review of the whole division. Governor Andrews, whose visit was unexpected, was much complimented for the appear