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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Washington on the Eve of the War. (search)
g his passage through the city, and by affiliating with them, these detectives obtained the details of the plot. Mr. Lincoln passed through Baltimore in advance of the time announced for the journey (in accordance with advice given by me to Mr. Seward and Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, March 4, 1861. (from a photograph.) which was carried by Mr. Frederick W. Seward to Mr. Lincoln), and arrived safe at Washington on the morning of the day he was to have passed through Baltimore. But thMr. Frederick W. Seward to Mr. Lincoln), and arrived safe at Washington on the morning of the day he was to have passed through Baltimore. But the plotting to prevent his inauguration continued; and there was only too good reason to fear that an attempt would be made against his life during the passage of the inaugural procession from Willard's hotel, where Mr. Lincoln lodged, to the Capitol. On the afternoon of the 3d of March, General Scott held a conference at his headquarters, there being present his staff, General Sumner, and myself, and then was arranged the programme of the procession. President Buchanan was to drive to Will
compose one half of his cabinet. In selecting Seward, Chase, Bates, and Cameron, he could also satiin the newly organized Republican party. With Seward from New York, Cameron from Pennsylvania, Chas The post of Secretary of State was offered to Seward on December 8. Rumors have got into the neur leave, this place in the administration. Seward asked a few days for reflection, and then cordse differences were insurmountable. Through Mr. Seward, who was attending his senatorial duties at Through his intimate correspondence with Mr. Seward and personal friends in Congress, Mr. Lincol a suite of about a dozen personal friends. Mr. Seward had suggested that in view of the feverish cwas met by Mr. Frederick W. Seward, son of Senator Seward, who brought him an important communicatioartment. The communication brought by young Mr. Seward contained, besides notes from his father andrning of February 23, where they were met by Mr. Seward and Representative Washburne of Illinois, an[1 more...]
Chapter 13. The secession movement South Carolina secession Buchanan's neglect disloyal cabinet members Washington central cabal Anderson's transfer to Sumter Star of the West Montgomery rebellion Davis and Stephens corner-stone theory Lincoln inaugurated his inaugural address Lincoln's cabinet the question of Sumter Seward's memorandum Lincoln's answer bombardment of Sumter Anderson's capitulation It is not the province of these chapters to relate in detail the course of the secession movement in the cotton States in the interim which elapsed between the election and inauguration of President Lincoln. Still less can space be given to analyze and set forth the lamentable failure of President Buchanan to employ the executive authority and power of the government to prevent it, or even to hinder its development, by any vigorous opposition or adequate protest. The determination of South Carolina to secede was announced by the governor of t
ned each his part in the new crime which had risen in his mind out of the abandoned abduction scheme. This plan was as brief and simple as it was horrible. Powell, alias Payne, the stalwart, brutal, simple-minded boy from Florida, was to murder Seward; Atzerodt, the comic villain of the drama, was assigned to remove Andrew Johnson; Booth reserved for himself the most conspicuous role of the tragedy. It was Herold's duty to attend him as page and aid him in his escape. Minor parts were given ill in bed, he had forced his way to Mr. Seward's room, on the pretext of being a messenger from the physician with a packet of medicine to deliver. The servant at the door tried to prevent him from going up-stairs; the Secretary's son, Frederick W. Seward, hearing the noise, stepped out into the hall to check the intruders. Payne rushed upon him with a pistol which missed fire, then rained blows with it upon his head, and, grappling and struggling, the two came to the Secretary's room and
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
country was very good, but I thought it advisable to have the testimony of one of the most active in it to sustain my views. For obvious reasons, I have not called on either of the other living parties to the matter, regarding the above sufficient to satisfy all reasonable persons that the assassination consummated in April, 1865, would have taken place in February of 1861 had it not been for the timely efforts of Lieutenant-General Scott, Brigadier-General Stone, Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Frederick W. Seward, Esq., and David S. Bookstaver, of the Metropolitan Police of New York. I am, very respectfully, yours, &c., John A. Kennedy. But little more remains to be said concerning affairs at Ball's Bluff. Supposing all the troops to be on the Virginia side of the Potomac, McClellan telegraphed to Stone to intrench himself there, and to hold his position, at all hazards, until re-enforcements should arrive. At the same time he ordered Banks to remove the remainder of his division to E
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
hey are the closing words in the dispatch of Mr. Seward: The four Commissioners will be cheerfully dated his dispatch to Lord Lyons, Nov. 30. Mr. Seward, the Secretary of State, in a confidential ne subject was free from much embarrassment. Mr. Seward expressed a hope that the British Governmentenied. letter of Charles Francis Adams to Mr. Seward, January 17th, 1862. and when the fact couldrices. letter of Charles Francis Adams to Mr. Seward, January 17th, 1862. an incident occurred oith Lord Lyons. On the 26th of December, Secretary Seward communicated to that Minister his letter he had declared, so late as Dec. 23d, that Mr. Seward would refuse, on the part of his Government,tates had insulted her more. Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward, Nov. 29th, 1861. in opposition to populthen, with the Queen's proclamation in mind, Mr. Seward spoke of the captives as pretended Ministers their communications, which were read to Secretary Seward, that Minister made the most friendly res[2 more...]
travelling dress. It is proper to state here that, prior to Mr. Lincoln's arrival in Philadelphia, Gen. Scott and Senator Seward, in Washington, had been apprised, from independent sources, that imminent danger threatened Mr. Lincoln in case he should publicly pass through Baltimore; and accordingly a special messenger, Mr. Frederick W. Seward, a son of Senator Seward, was despatched to Philadelphia, to urge Mr. Lincoln to come direct to Washington, in a quiet manner. The messenger arrivedSenator Seward, was despatched to Philadelphia, to urge Mr. Lincoln to come direct to Washington, in a quiet manner. The messenger arrived in Philadelphia late on Thursday night, and had an interview with the President-elect, immediately subsequent to his interview with the detective. He was informed that Mr. Lincoln would arrive by the early train on Saturday morning, and, in accorda, awaited the President-elect at the depot in Washington, whence he was taken in a carriage to Willard's Hotel, where Senator Seward stood ready to receive him. The detective travelled with Mr. Lincoln under the name of E. J. Allen, which name was
Doc. 47.--correspondence between Mr. Seward and the Confederate Commissioners. The following is the correspondence between the Secretary of State and the Commissioners from the Confederate States:-- Messrs. Forsyth and Crawford to Mr. Seward, opening negotiation and stating the case. Washington city, March 12, 1861. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State of the United States: Sir :--The undersigned have been duly accredited by the government of the Confederate States of America asMr. Seward, opening negotiation and stating the case. Washington city, March 12, 1861. Hon. Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State of the United States: Sir :--The undersigned have been duly accredited by the government of the Confederate States of America as Commissioners to the government of the United States, and in pursuance of their instructions have now the honor to acquaint you with that fact, and to make known, through you, to the President of the United States, the objects of their presence in this Capital. Seven States of the late federal Union having, in the exercise of the inherent right of every free people to change or reform their political institutions, and through conventions of their people, withdrawn from the United States and
s, two gentlemen of official distinction as high as that of the personage hitherto alluded to aided the undersigned as intermediaries in these unofficial negotiations for peace. The undersigned, Commissioners of the Confederate States of America, having thus made answer to all they deem material in the memorandum filed in the Department on the 15th of March last, have the honor to be, John Forsyth, Martin J. Crawford, A. B. Roman. A true copy of the original by one delivered to Mr. F. W. Seward, Assistant Secretary of State of the United States, at 8 o'clock in the evening of April 9, 1861. Attest, J. T. Pickett, Secretary, &c., &c. Mr. Seward in reply to the Commissioners, acknowledges the receipt of their letter, but declines to answer it. Department of State, Wasuington, April 10, 1861. Messrs. Forsyth, Crawford, and Roman, having been apprised by a memorandum which has been delivered to them, that the Secretary of State is not at liberty to hold official interc
Gen. Twiggs arrived at New Orleans Tuesday, and was received with salutes. Speeches from Mr. Seward and Gen. Scott. The New Yorkers, in Washington on Monday, called in a body on Mr. Seward.Mr. Seward. The residence of Mr. Seward is on F street. On the steps, as the line drew up, was Mr. Seward, who, in reply to an address from their spokesman, said: "Friends, fellow-citizens, and neighborsMr. Seward is on F street. On the steps, as the line drew up, was Mr. Seward, who, in reply to an address from their spokesman, said: "Friends, fellow-citizens, and neighbors-- I am deeply affected by this mark of respect. It is now twelve years since I came here to represent the State of New York. I am once more, thank God, a private citizen of my native State. "MMr. Seward, who, in reply to an address from their spokesman, said: "Friends, fellow-citizens, and neighbors-- I am deeply affected by this mark of respect. It is now twelve years since I came here to represent the State of New York. I am once more, thank God, a private citizen of my native State. "My record here for a period equal to one-sixth of the period of this Republic, is before you, and it contains the account of the manner in which I have discharged my duty; and now, in the presence of mought to be, 'one--United and Indivisible. '" A more detailed report of the speech makes Mr. Seward say: "I believe I know the character and purposes of the Chief Magistrate; I believe that
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