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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 342 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 180 2 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 178 2 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 168 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 122 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 118 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 118 2 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 106 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 102 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 97 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William H. Seward or search for William H. Seward in all documents.

Your search returned 52 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association Listens to a masterly oration by Judge Charles E. Fenner. (search)
dapted to the wants of the country; he augmented the seacoast and frontier defenses; he had the western part of the continent explored for scientific, geographical and railroad purposes. He was universally recognized as a great secretary of war, and few have filled that high office who left behind him more enduring monuments of wise and efficient administration. Let us now return to Mr. Davis' career as a senator. That was the era of senatorial giants. Clay, Webster, Calhoun, Benton, Seward, Benjamin, Douglas, Toombs, and a host of other men hardly less distinguished adorned its rolls and formed a galaxy of genius such as has rarely been gathered in any deliberative body. It is not too much to say that Jefferson Davis promptly took his place amongst the foremost of them all, and won speedy and universal recognition as inferior to none in power of debate, in forensic eloquence, in indomitable courage and tact, in breadth and depth of knowledge, and in masterly equipment for all
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
Lincoln, and the attempted assassination of Mr. Seward. He, therefore, offers for the arrest of Daberty and property of individuals. Such was Mr. Seward's theory, and such was the practice of himse participants were President Lincoln and William H. Seward, Secretary of State of the United StatesA. Lincoln. At the same time he sent to Mr. Seward, who had already gone to Fortress Monroe, the following telegram: To Hon. William H. Seward, Fortress Monroe, Va.: Induced by a dispatch ftrol of any European power. Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Seward concurred in the statement that such was theHe wished to know something of the details. Mr. Seward then said he desired that any answer to Judgut any further effusion of fraternal blood. Mr. Seward, while admitting that the views presented byended, unless provided for by stipulations. Mr. Seward replied that as to all questions involving rn, but the courts might decide differently. Mr. Seward said there were only about two hundred thous[15 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
Jacob Thompson, George N. Sanders, Beverley Tucker, and W. C. Cleary, incited and concerted the assassination of Mr. Lincoln, and the attempted assassination of Mr. Seward. He, therefore, offers for the arrest of Davis, Clay, and Thompson $100,000 each; for Sanders and Tucker, $25,000 each; and for Cleary, $10,000. Publish this icase. This was doubtless some natural expression of gratitude. The letter, after being inspected by the Secretary of War, Mr. Stanton, the Secretary of State, Mr. Seward, and the Attorney-General, Mr. Speed, was returned for amendment, being regarded in its then condition as an improper communication. (Id., pp. 655, 656, 657 aners, there was behind the scenes some adverse influence which was too powerful to be overcome, which Mr. O'Conor believed emanated from the Secretary of State, W. H. Seward. When Mr. Reverdy Johnson, the senator from Maryland, applied to Seward to help him in the effort to secure bail, Seward pointed to the scar on his neck, made
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the history Committee (search)
generally, let them read a little book entitled The Old Capital and Its Inmates, which has inscribed on its cover what Mr. Seward boastingly said to Lord Lyons, the British Minister at Washington, on September 14, 1861, viz: My Lord (he says), Il of the United States under Mr. Buchanan, one of the most distinguished lawyers and writers of his day, thus writes of Mr. Seward and his little bell: Now as to the little bell. The same Higher Law which gave the Federal Government power to lexecutive outrage that might be desired for party purposes, on the life, liberty and property of individuals. Such was Mr. Seward's theory, and such was the practice of himself and his subordinates, and some of his colleagues. He says further tonce the fall of Robespierre (he says), nothing has occurred to cast so much disrepute on republican institutions. When Mr. Seward went into the State Department he took a little bell to his office, in place of the statute book, and this piece of sou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
participants were President Lincoln and William H. Seward, Secretary of State of the United StatesA. Lincoln. At the same time he sent to Mr. Seward, who had already gone to Fortress Monroe, the commissioners met President Lincoln and Secretary Seward on board of a steamer anchored in Hamptontrol of any European power. Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Seward concurred in the statement that such was theut any further effusion of fraternal blood. Mr. Seward, while admitting that the views presented byonal authorities to resume their functions. Mr. Seward then said that Mr. Lincoln could not expressended, unless provided for by stipulations. Mr. Seward replied that as to all questions involving rn, but the courts might decide differently. Mr. Seward said there were only about two hundred thousf the Confederate States, and their people. Mr. Seward insisted that no words like unconditional suiendly leave of each other. Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Seward returned to Washington, and Messrs. Stephens[8 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
t, Escape of Lieutenant W. W. George from, 229; officers at, 234. Rayner, Hon Kenneth, 37. Randolph, General George W., 201. Reams' Station, Battle of. 289. Rehel, a term of honor, 130. Richmond, Fall of, April 3, 1865, 152 Socially during the war, 151; Light Dragoons, Roll of, 366. Sabine Pass, Notable Battle of, 314. Salem Church as Hospital, 171. Sanders, Colonel C. C, 172. Saunders, Hon. Romulus M., 33. St. Paul's Church, 154. Secession, Right of, 150. Seward, W. H., his little bell, 122, 190. Sharpsburg, Battle of, 307. Sheridan, General P. H., Vandalism of, 117. Sherman, General W. T., made war hell, 107, 280. Sherry, Sergeant, 9. Shiloh, Battle of, 357. Slaves, General Cleburne's plan to put into the army, 173; Extension of territory for 18. Squirrel Level Fort, 289. Stephens, A. H., his fidelity and acumen, 185. Stuart, General J. E. B., 169; how killed, 227, 335. Surratt, Mrs., Execution of, 122. Taylor, Governor