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.) His arrival in Washington. This morning, shortly before o'clock, Mr. Seward winded his way down to Wil- lard's where he remained almost solitary and aloected. When the train's passengers for the house did arrive, the mystery of Mr. Seward's so early appearance at the hotel was instantly cleared up; for the tall figo friends only, Mr. E. J. Allen, of New York, and Mr. Lammon. Accompanied by Mr. Seward, he immediately retired to parlor No. 6 of the house, which, with the magnifiy here. At half-past 9 Mr. Lincoln breakfasted in his sitting room. Mr. Seward again joined him shortly before 11 A. M., and taking a carriage, they proceedhaving Mr. Lincoln's card so unexpectedly sent up to him. He received him and Mr. Seward immediately, in his private parlor, where they had a social and agreeable introm that chamber, they met Messrs. Bigler and John Cochrane in the house, and Mr. Seward presented those gentlemen to the President elect. From the President's h
act which harrows the sensibilities of the patriotic Horace to the core. He professes to have no taste nor scent for the official larder, nevertheless, because Mr. Seward, in the innocence of his unsophisticated nature, did not offer him that which he supposed he would not have, he defeated the Presidential aspirations of Seward Seward at Chicago and secured the nomination of the "Honest Old Ape" of Illinois. Now comes Seward's revenge. He is made Premier, and his trusty Lieutenant, Thurlow Weed, outgeneraling Greeley at every move, is believed to control the dispensation of the official patronage. To a man of Horace's high sense of honor, this ingratitude ofSeward's revenge. He is made Premier, and his trusty Lieutenant, Thurlow Weed, outgeneraling Greeley at every move, is believed to control the dispensation of the official patronage. To a man of Horace's high sense of honor, this ingratitude of Lincoln must be as crushing as the dagger with which "the well beloved Brutus"" stabbed the Roman tyrant. We expect to hear soon that "Ingratitude, more keen than traitor's steel," has made an end of Greeley.
the 6th of November. Nothing is going wrong, nobody is hurt, and it is only necessary to set the foot down firm and take a decided stand. A few hundred soldiers in Washington brought the border States to their senses — all that is required now is a little vigor on the part of the Government. The "Pro-slavery Rebellion" will be crushed out, very quickly. Is it true, as stated here, that the Virginia Convention will sit for a year to come, and that its policy is controlled by private advices from Seward? Is it the sole object of the Convention to perfect the organization of the Union-Republican party, in conformity with the wishes of the author of the "irrepressible conflict !" Rarey exhibits his horse-taming powers next Wednesday night. Somebody suggests that it will be a raree-show. It is suggested, further, that Rarey be requested to try his hand on Mrs. Abe. She has never been yet — not even by six feet and four inches of solid, bony, rail-splitting manhood. Ze
"that neither the Constitution, nor any amendment thereof, shall be constituted to give Congress power to legislate to abolish or control, within any State or Territory, the relation of slavery, nor the power to interfere with the slave trade," was offered as an adjustment. The Conference is in session to-night, and strong efforts are being made to come to a conclusion on the subject before adjournment. The most reliable report as to the construction of Lincoln's Cabinet is that Mr. Seward will be Secretary of State; Mr. Bates, or Missouri, Attorney General; Mr. Gilmore, of North Carolina, Secretary of the Navy; C. B. Smith, of Indiana, Secretary of the Interior; Mr. Wells, Postmaster General; Gen. Cameron, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of the Treasury. Several gentlemen are prominently mentioned for Secretary of War. The statement is thus communicated without vouching for its accuracy. Private advices received to-day from Montgomery say that very soon a Commissioner wil