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as ditches, rat-holes, trees, etc. We are going to our old position. I am sick at camp. June 5.--We are still besieged by the Yanks. Another day has passed and no reinforcements. Sim Herring was wounded in. the head to-day. The Yanks are still sharp-shooting, also using their artillery with but little effect. We hear a great many different reports. June 6.--The river is falling very fast. It is very, very hot weather. Several shots from Whistling Dick came over our camp to-day. Sewell is shelling the Yanks. I expect to go to the breastworks in the morning. Several of the boys are at camp sick. June 7.--Another day has dawned and no reenforcements. I shall go to the breastworks this morning. The Yanks are still popping away from their rifle-pits. One of company B was killed to-day while looking over the breastwork. It is very, very hot, and we have lain in the ditch all day. June 8.--The Yanks began to sharp-shoot at daybreak. We had two men killed yesterday.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 22: the War on the Potomac and in Western Virginia. (search)
rm in center of cask, on which the fusee was coiled and secured. 9, Fusee. This infernal machine was to be set afloat with the tide in the direction of the vessel to be destroyed, after the fusee or slow match was lighted. This was the beginning of the use of torpedoes, which the insurgents employed very extensively during the war. Others will be hereafter delineated and described. Torpedo. This attack on the works of the insurgents on Matthias Point, and those on the batteries at Sewell's and Pig Point, and at Acquia Creek, convinced the Government that little could be done by armed vessels, without an accompanying land force, competent to meet the foe in fair battle. While these events were transpiring in the region of the Potomac, others equally stirring and important were occurring in Northwestern Virginia. For a month after the dash on Romney, June 11, 1861. Colonel Wallace and his regiment were placed in an important and perilous position at Cumberland, in Western
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 4: military operations in Western Virginia, and on the sea-coast (search)
f Bull's Run, this department was left with less than 15,000 men to guard 800 miles of railroad, and 300 miles of frontier, exposed to bushwhackers, and the forces of Generals Floyd, Wise, and Jackson. The northwestern pass into it was fortified and held, Cheat Mountain secured, the rebel assaults there victoriously repelled, and the Kanawha. Valley occupied. A march of 112 miles, over bad roads, brought you upon Floyd's intrenched position, whence, the rebels were dislodged and chased to Sewell. Finally, your patience and watchings put the traitor Floyd: within your reach, and though, by a precipitate retreat, he escaped your grasp, you have the substantial fruits. of victory. Western Virginia belongs to herself, and the invader is expelled from her soil. In the name of our Commander-in-Chief, and in my own, I thank you. Thus ended the campaigns in the Kanawha Valley. On the 10th of November, a most unhappy event occurred in the extreme southwestern portion of Virginia. T
as ditches, rat-holes, trees, etc. We are going to our old position. I am sick at camp. June 5.--We are still besieged by the Yanks. Another day has passed and no reenforcements. Sim Herring was wounded in the head to-day. The Yanks are still sharp-shooting, also using their artillery with but little effect. We hear a great many different reports. June 6.--The river is falling very fast. It is very, very hot weather. Several shots from Whistling Dick came over our camp to-day. Sewell is shelling the Yanks. I expect to go to the breastworks in the morning. Several of the boys are at camp, sick. June 7.--Another day has dawned and no reenforcements. I shall go to the breastworks this morning. The Yanks are still popping away from their rifle-pits. One of company B was killed to-day while looking over the breastwork. It is very, very hot, and we have lain in the ditch all day. June 8.--The Yanks began to sharp-shoot at daybreak. We had two men killed yesterday.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 144. the Lord Mayor's Banquet. (search)
ous crowd to see the pageant, in addition to the interest which, in the popular estimation, has always been peculiarly its own. As usual, the chief interest of the occasion at first centred in Guildhall, with its precincts, as the place from which the procession was to start. About twelve o'clock, the procession, marshalled according to order, moved off on its way to Westminster, with a flourish of trumpets. The Lord Mayor, (Right Hon. William Cubitt,) accompanied by his chaplain, and by Mr. Sewell and Mr. Beddome, his sword and mace bearers, in the state carriage of the Corporation, drawn by six horses, and attended by a cavalry escort, was of course the principal person of interest in the pageant. Next to him in point of attraction, were the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex, with their chaplains, each in a splendid chariot, drawn by four horses. The Lord Mayor having been sworn in, the accustomed inaugural entertainment took place in Guildhall in the evening, which was appropriat
the workshops, storehouses, and other buildings in ruins, having been set on fire by the rebels, who, at the same time, partially blew up the dry-dock. I also visited Craney Island, where I found thirty-nine guns of large calibre, most of which were spiked; also a large number of shot and shell, with about five thousand pounds of powder, all of which, with the buildings, were in good order. As far as I have been able to ascertain, we have taken about two hundred cannon, including those at Sewell's Point batteries, together with a large number of shot and shell, as well as many other articles of value stationed at the Navy-Yard, Craney Island, Sewell's Point, and other places. John E. Wool, Major-General Commanding New-York times account. Ocean view, opposite Fort Monroe, Saturday evening, 8 o'clock. Norfolk and Gosport Navy-Yard again belong to the United States. Our troops, under General Wool, entered and took possession of the town at five o'clock in the afternoon, r
present, to protect Norfolk, and thus afford time to remove the public property. On the next day, at ten o'clock A. M., we observed from the Virginia that the flag was not flying on the Sewell's Point battery, and that it appeared to have been abandoned: I despatched Lieut. J. P. Jones, the Flag-Lieutenant, to Craney Island, where the confederate flag was still flying, and he there learned that a large force of the enemy had landed on Bay Shore, and were marching rapidly on Norfolk; that Sewell's Point battery was abandoned, and our troops were retreating. I then despatched the same officer to Norfolk, to confer with Gen. Huger and Capt. Lee. He found the navy-yard in flames, and that all its officers had left by railroad. On reaching Norfolk he found that Gen. Huger and all the other officers of the army had also left, that the enemy were within half a mile of the city, and that the Mayor was treating for its surrender. On returning to the ship, he found that Craney Island a
Doc. 26.-attack on Sewell's point, Va. Report of Com. Goldsborough. U. S. Flag-ship Minnesota, Hampton roads, Va., May 9. To His Excellency the President of the United States: sir: Agreeably to a communication just received from the Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, I have the honor to report that the instructions I gave yesterday to the officers commanding the several vessels detailed to open fire upon Sewell's Point, were that the object of the move was to ascertain the practicability of landing a body of troops thereabouts, and to reduce the works if it could be done; that the wooden vessels should attack the principal works in enfilade, and that the Monitor, to be accompanied by the Stevens, should go up as far as the works and there operate in front. On the Merrimac's appearance outside of the works the Monitor had orders to fall back into fair channel-way, and only to engage her seriously in such a position that this ship, together with the merchant vessels intended for the
has two guns, the latter eight. The Monitor is our chief dependence. If any accident should befall her Newport News would be taken, probably depending on the land force. It is said Magruder has from 15,000 to 18,000 men extending from James river to Yorktown. I have almost 12,500 effective troops, including the garrison of Fortress Monroe, and only about 110 regulars artillery. I do not believe the channel could be blocked between Sewell's Point and Craney island without first taking Sewell's battery, consisting of from 25 to 30 guns, several of which are 10-inch. John E. Wool, Maj.-Gen. Heintzelman to McClellan.Fort Lyon, March 13. Gen. McClellan: Allow me to recommend to you to have a complete survey made, by the engineers, of the enemy's works at Centreville and Manassas, with a memoir to meet the false statements that will be made to your prejudice. S. P. Heintzelman, Brig.-Gen. Dennison to McClellan.Washington, March 14. Gen. McClellan: Have just l
Doc. 177.-attack on Sewell's point, May 19, 1861. The following is the official report of the action between the United States war-steamer Star and the Sewell's Point battery, on the 19th inst. United States steamer Star, May 19, 1861. flag officer S. H. Stringham, Commander of the Home Squadron:-- From the time I reported to you yesterday I kept a strict watch on the movements of the enemy in and about the Sewell's Point battery. Several noises were heard during the night, but not dthe Monticello, stationed off the point. The Kahokee perceiving from certain demonstrations on the part of the Monticello that it would be unsafe to proceed to her destination, landed her men at Boush's bluff, a point some two miles this side of Sewell's, where a small battery had been erected. This had hardly been accomplished, before the Monticello steamed up and fired two shots, both of which passed over the tug without inflicting any damage. The fire was responded to by the battery at Bou
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