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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Records of Longstreet's corps, A. N. V. (search)
s now poured upon them, but without halting to reform the line, disintegrated and much reduced by the double quick through the woods, a charge was made upon a battery (Kern's) about three hundred yards distant (near Mitlock's house) supported by Seymour's brigade, the left brigade of McCall's division. The impetuosity of the charge broke the enemy's line and for a time the battery was in Kemper's possession, but the handful of men who gained it were unable to maintain it long before the heavy its cannoneers. Strange, emerging on the field about this time, made a gallant charge on the position, and, after a sharp affair with its supports, took the battery and held it permanently turning its guns upon the enemy, and completely routing Seymour's brigade. While these operations were taking place upon the right, the conflict had also been taken up upon the centre by Andrews' battery of Hill's division, and by R. H. Anderson's brigade under Colonel Jenkins. Moving forward at the same
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Seacoast defences of South Carolina and Georgia. (search)
aided General Wise to inflict a handsome defeat upon the strong Federal column which was pushed out by that way in February, 1864, to strike and break Beauregard's communications with Savannah, and occupy his attention pending the descent of General Seymour's powerful military and political expedition into Florida; and when that skill-fully planned expedition was brought to signal disaster at Olustee, on the 20th February, 1864, it was Colquit's brigade, whose opportune appearance on the field on John's Island had been so effective, which, by its precisely timed arrival, contributed even more decisively to the victory over Seymour. It was under similarly changed or modified dispositions of the defensive resources (material and personnel) of the department, that Brannan's column of more than 4,000 infantry, with two sections of field artillery and a naval detachment with three boat howitzers, was badly defeated at Pocotaligo in October, 1862, by less than five hundred men and twelv
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 14: the Richmond campaign. (search)
enemy with wavering fortunes, unable to rout them, but winning some ground, which he stubbornly held against a terrible artillery and musketry fire. General Ewell moved next, with one brigade upon the left, and two upon the right of the road which led from Gaines's Mill toward the Federal left. Crossing the marsh, he ascended the opposing hill-side, and engaged the enemy in the forest. Before their terrific fire, General Elzey, commanding his left brigade, fell severely wounded, and Colonel Seymour, commanding the Louisiana brigade of Taylor, was slain. Whole regiments were killed, wounded, or scattered, under this leaden tempest; but still their dauntless General rallied his fainting men, repaired his line, and held all his ground against the double and triple lines of the enemy; until just as his ammunition was exhausted, welcome succors arrived under General Lawton. One cause of delay in the arrival of the remaining troops has already been seen, in the larger space which t
ad been sacrificed, and with more justice than usual, to popular clamor. General Geo. G. Meade replaced him in command, and strained every nerve to collect numbers of men, irrespective of quality — seeming to desire to crush the invasion by weight alone. Wild was the alarm in the North when the rebel advance had, penetrated the heart of Pennsylvania; when York was held by Early and laid under contribution and Harrisburg was threatened by Ewell. The whole North rose in its might. Governors Seymour, of New York, Andrew, of Massachusetts, and Curtin, of Pennsylvania, put their whole militia at the service of the President; the energy at Washington, momentarily paralyzed, soon recovered; and by the last day of the month, Meade had collected an army of near 200,000 men. Many of these were, of course, new levies and raw militia; but near one-half were the veterans of the armies of McClellan, Burnside and Hooker; men who had fought gallantly on southern soil and might be expected to d
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 32: battles of the Wilderness. (search)
ft, getting in rear of the enemy. Major Daniel, not hearing from Gordon, had endeavored to get to him, when, finding the condition of things, he attempted to lead one of Pegram's regiments to his assistance, and was shot down while behaving with great gallantry, receiving a wound in the leg which has permanently disabled him. Notwithstanding the confusion in part of his brigade, Gordon succeeded in throwing the enemy's right flank into great confusion, capturing two brigadier generals (Seymour and Shaler), and several hundred prisoners, all of the 6th corps, under Sedgwick. The advance of Pegram's brigade, and the demonstration of Johnston's brigade in the rear, where it encountered a part of the enemy's force and captured some prisoners, contributed materially to the result. It was fortunate, however, that darkness came to close this affair, as the enemy, if he had been able to discover the disorder on our side, might have brought up fresh troops and availed himself of our con
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
382, 393 Salem Church, 218, 233 Santa Anna, 471 Savage Station, 77, 87 Savannah, 190 Scales, General, 355 School House Hill, 136, 137 Scott, Captain, John, 4, 6 Scott, Colonel, 93, 180 Scott, General, 1, 38, 39, 42 Secret Service Corps, 88, 89 Sedgwick, General (U. S. A.), 148, 151, 197, 201, 203-04, 207, 214, 217-220, 228, 231, 233-34, 281, 309, 321, 360 Seminary Hill, 270, 276 Semmes, General, 147 Seven Pines, 74 Seventh Street Pike, 389 Seymour, General (U. S. A.), 350 Shady Grove, 351-355 Shaler, General (U. S. A.), 350 Sharpsburg, 139, 140, 153, 157, 162, 186, 190, 192, 254, 391, 403 Shenandoah, 10, 74, 136-37, 160, 164- 165, 237, 239, 240, 284, 295, 332, 343, 366-369, 371, 396, 407, 414, 439, 455, 476 Shepherdstown, 139, 162, 253-54, 284, 408-09-10 Sheridan, General (U. S. A.), 40, 371, 379, 406-411, 414, 419, 427, 430, 433, 437, 441, 452-53, 456, 459, 461, 465-66, 475 Sherman, General (U. S. A.), 40, 393 Shields, General
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 4: up the St. John's. (search)
f the black soldiers all their favorite imagery of the Judgment-Day; and those who were not too much depressed by disappointment were excited by the spectacle, and sang and exhorted without ceasing. With heavy hearts their officers floated down the lovely river, which we had ascended with hopes so buoyant; and from that day to this, the reasons for our recall have never been made public. It was commonly attributed to proslavery advisers, acting on the rather impulsive nature of Major-General Hunter, with a view to cut short the career of the colored troops, and stop their recruiting. But it may have been simply the scarcity of troops in the Department, and the renewed conviction at Headquarters that we were too few to hold the post alone. The latter theory was strengthened by the fact that, when General Seymour reoccupied Jacksonville, the following year, he took with him twenty thousand men instead of one thousand,--and the sanguinary battle of Olustee found him with too few.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 11: Florida again? (search)
f course, thrown back into the old uncertainty, and if the small-pox subsides (and it is really diminishing decidedly) we may yet come in at the wrong end of the Florida affair. February 19. Not a bit of it! This morning the General has ridden up radiant, has seen General Gillmore, who has decided not to order us to Florida at all, nor withdraw any of this garrison. Moreover, he says that all which is intended in Florida is done,--that there will be no advance to Tallahassee, and General Seymour will establish a camp of instruction in Jacksonville. Well, if that is all, it is a lucky escape. We little dreamed that on that very day the march toward Olustee was beginning. The battle took place next day, and I add one more extract to show how the news reached Beaufort. February 23, 1864. There was the sound of revelry by night at a ball in Beaufort last night, in a new large building beautifully decorated. All the collected flags of the garrison hung round and over us,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Index. (search)
t., 270, 271, Roberts, Samuel, 243. Rogers, J. S., Capt., 94, 180, 266, Rogers, Seth, Surg., 76, 94, 269. Rust, J. D., Col., 119, 120, 122,1 Sammis, Col., 27. Sampson, W. W., Capt., 176, 27( Saxton, M. W., Lt., 272. Saxton, Rufus, Gen. 2, 3,7,8, 35 37, 39, 4 2, 48, 52, 60 f 75 93 97, 100, 143, 168, 25 22, 234, 236, 237, 241, 244,24 276, 278,280 2 82 284, 288. Searles, J. M., t., 272. Sears, Capt., 82. Selvage, J. W., Lt., 272. Serrell, E. W., Col., 272. Seward, W. H., 251. Seymour, T. Gen., 129, 240. Shaw, R. G., Col., 176, 224, 225 293. Sherman, W. T., Gen., 176, 263. Showalter, Lt.-Col., 124. Simmons, London, Corpl. 260. Small, Robert, Capt., 7, 65. Smith, Mr., 92. Sprague, A. B. R., Col., 2. Stafford, Col., 277. Stanton, E. M., Hon., 280. Steedman, Capt., 127. Stevens, Capt., 68. Stevens, Thaddeus, Hon., 287, 288. 231, Stickney, Judge, 41, 97, 107. Stockdale, W., Lt. 271. Stone, H. A., Lt., 271, 272. Strong, J. D., Lt.-Col., 65, 90,122,178, 181,
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXII. January, 1863 (search)
urg, and the city was not taken; on the contrary, the enemy had sailed away. I trust this is reliable; but the Northern papers persist in saying that Vicksburg has fallen, and that the event took place on the 3d inst. Six hundred women and children-refugees — arrived at Petersburg yesterday from the North. They permit them to come now, when famine and pestilence are likely to be added to the other horrors of war! We are doomed to suffer this winter! January 11 The message of Gov. Seymour, of New York, if I am not mistaken in its import and purposes, will have a distracting effect on the subjugation programme of the government at Washington. I shall look for riots, and perhaps rebellions and civil wars in the North. Mr. Stanley, ycleped Governor of North Carolina, has written a letter (dated 31st December) to Gen. French, complaining that our soldiery have been guilty of taking slaves from their humane and loyal masters in Washington County, against their will; and de
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