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The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1863., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for D. L. Seymour or search for D. L. Seymour in all documents.

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llowing telegrams show what efforts are being made to bring the people to the sticking point: Troy, July 19--12:15 A. M.-- An immense war meeting was held here last night in Court-House Square, to strengthen the hands of the President, and to raise money and men in the 17th Senatorial district, composed of Rensselaer and Washington counties. The masses were unanimous in this regard, and were addressed by Judge Gould, of the Supreme Court; Hon. Chas. Hughes, ex-member of Congress; Hon. D. L. Seymour, ex-member of Congress; Hon. G. R. Van Santvoord, ex-Senator, Thos. B. Carroll, Alderman McManus, Hon. Charles R. Ingalls, Rev. Duncan Kennedy, President of Lewis University of Troy, and others. Resolutions were passed, and a liberal bounty was resolved upon. The meeting adjourned amid the utmost enthusiasm. Two regiments from Rensselaer and Washington counties may be rolled upon within 30 days. Bangor, Me., July 17, 1862.--A grand patriotic meeting was held here this evening i
litia force of all the Yankee States, and that a draft will be made sufficiently large to meet what the Yankees consider the exigencies of their service. It is well, therefore, to be prepared for the worst they can do, and, above all things, to avoid sinking into that lethargy of soul and body which benumbed the councils and paralyzed the arm of the Confederacy after the battle of Manassas. Yet there is very little doubt that there is a large and powerful body of citizens, of whom Governor Seymour and Benjamin Wood are the representatives, who are bitterly opposed to the present war, who abhor the objects for which it is waged, and who dissent entirely from the principles of those who are most active in pressing it on. Persons of this description dare not face the reign of terror which has been inaugurated by the Abolitionists, knowing that it is as much as their lives are worth to speak their real sentiments. The Abolitionists have it all their own way. It is they who are urgin
Ex-Governor Seymour. The letter of Ex-Governor Seymour, of Connecticut, deprecating a war of subjugation, is worthy of that able statesman and estimable gentleman. He has maintained a consistent position during the war, and will be in after times remembered as one of the very few men at the North who had the reason, humanity and courage to object to the character and purposes of the atrocious crusade against the South. We gave an extract from his letter yesterday, and now reprint the foEx-Governor Seymour, of Connecticut, deprecating a war of subjugation, is worthy of that able statesman and estimable gentleman. He has maintained a consistent position during the war, and will be in after times remembered as one of the very few men at the North who had the reason, humanity and courage to object to the character and purposes of the atrocious crusade against the South. We gave an extract from his letter yesterday, and now reprint the following notable passage: "The monstrous fallacy of the present day, that the Union can be re-established by destroying any part of the South, is one which will burst with the shells that are thrown into its defenceless cities, and leave the condition of this country, after its treasures are exhausted, and its brave men on both sides consigned to hospitals and graves, a spectacle for reproach or commiseration of the civilized world."