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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 50 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 44 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 25 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 23, 1863., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 17 1 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 12 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for Horatio Seymour or search for Horatio Seymour in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

aut of Printing-House Square will grin approbation at us, with his gaping, bloody mouth — the bulky bales will again fill our ships — the Patriarchs will again adorn and fortify our Legislative halls — dear, delightful internal, not to say infernal, commerce will be resumed — churches will flourish and missions will multiply — of ploughshares and pruning-hooks there will be no end in the land! Talk about conscience! We assert without fear of contradiction from any good Conservative of the Seymour-Brooks-Wood-en order, that no nation can afford to maintain a conscience. Conscience neither sows nor reaps, nor gathers into barns, nor lays up treasure on earth, nor spins nor owns ships. What do they care for conscience in Downing Street? Where would Louis Napoleon have been now, if instead of keeping two or three mistresses, he had been fool enough to keep a conscience? Tormented still by his tailor in a London garret! Of all ridiculous things in this ridiculous old world, thrice
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Saulsbury's Sentiments. (search)
ated. It hears of the victories of its Northern Democratic friends with infinite nonchalance. It does n't vouchsafe a Thank you!, to any of its volunteer Knights in the loyal States. It laughs at Saulsbury and with great justice, since it is not given to any mortal to sit upon two stools at the same time. No human being can gaze with profound respect upon a Union Senator with Secession principles. The late Democratic victories which cost so much money, and hard swearing, and sinfully persuasive speeches, and general and unblushing self-stultification, are regarded by the rebels with a really cruel contempt. Gov. Seymour may be ready to fall weeping upon the neck of Jefferson Davis, but Davis is sensitive about the neck and begs leave to decline the proffered embraces. After all conceivable negotiations and tender diplomacy, we come back again to dry knocks at last, and one of the driest of these, if we may credit Saulsbury, is the Emancipation Proclamation. January 14, 1863.
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Contagion of Secession. (search)
; but success has opened their mouths and filled their hearts with abominable political devices. We are beginning to see that about the worst battle lost to the Union cause, thus far, is that of the New York State election. Nobody believes Horatio Seymour to be friendly to the Administration, or to feel any honest sympathy with its embarrassments — yet he is elected Governor. The mob in Albany has given us a bitter foretaste of possible anarchy. From the West we hear of schemes designed bus — would be then as they are now, and as they always have been, the ready agents of Slavery, and the paid pimps of the Slaveholding interest. Establish a State upon the basis of Man-owning upon this continent, and the minds of Wood, Brooks, Seymour, and all that genus will gravitate towards it with all the force of a bad nature. Given these men in power, and the Northern Republic would be the bought, if not the born, thrall of the Davis Dynasty, ready in Cabinet and Congress to do its dir
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), What shall we do with them? (search)
he desert, were found to have their spirits completely broken by their masters. When they came into Mogadore, he says, They appeared degraded, and below the negro slave — every spring of hope or exertion was destroyed in their minds — they were abject, servile, and brutified. This is said by a white observer of white men just emancipated — we believe that no Pro-Slavery scribbler has said anything worse of the liberated black man. The gist of the matter is just this: if we should take Gov. Seymour, for instance — we take him as at present the leading white man of New York — if we should put him upon a year-long course of short rations and sharp floggings, and heavy taskwork, the presumption is that he would not come out from his disciplinary probation that choice combination of excellent qualities, that epitome of grace and greatness, that abridgment of all that is pleasant in man, that ornament and safeguard of the community, which the majority now thankfully acknowledge him to
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Waiting for a Partner. (search)
would expect them to display any extraordinary vigor in the field or to maintain the Constitution there with any tenacity? Nobody in his right mind. A Democratic Administration — we say it without fear of contradiction — would be a Peace-at-any-price Administration. Nothing better than semi-treason would be expected of it; nothing better than haggling, patching and most disreputable bargaining. Erring sisters, depart in peace! would be its legend. If the people choose to trust Brooks, Seymour) the Woods and men of like kidney with the adjustment of national differences, why the people are omnipotent and can do that in haste which they will bitterly rue at leisure. If the army be in the least demoralized and the progress of the war at all suspended, the fault lies at the door of the Democratic party. If it has done so much mischief out of office, of what will it not be capable in power? Wise and honest men, true lovers of the Union, would look with fear, trembling, distrust an