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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 50 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 48 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 44 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 25 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 23, 1863., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 3, 1864., [Electronic resource] 17 1 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 12 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Horatio Seymour or search for Horatio Seymour in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

nce. The Tweddle Hall Convention at Albany, 1861 Seymour, Thayer, etc. peace Conterence or Congress at Washington m had been chosen to seats in Congress, while three Horatio Seymour, Amasa J. Parker, and William Kelly. of them had been seeking their own prosperity in their own way. Gov. Horatio Seymour followed, berating the Republicans generally, but eose against whom this pragmatic action is directed. Gov. Seymour proceeded to argue that the North had. thus far. had grnd distinguishes it among the nations of the earth? Gov. Seymour proceeded to dilate on the valor and sagacity of the meommonest exhibitions of sincerity and patriotism. Thus Gov. Seymour continues: Let us take care that we do not mistake lar vote, as the only means of averting civil war? Yet Gov. Seymour demanded the submission of the Crittenden Compromise tothe sentiments expressed by Messrs. Parker, A. B. Johnson, Seymour, Thayer, etc., and the approving response which they elici
ce by, the Southern Confederacy by expelling or suppressing all fanatics, and adopting the Montgomery Constitution, thus legalizing slaveholding as well as slavehunting on their soil. Among those who were understood to urge such adhesion were Gov. Seymour, of New York, Judge Woodward and Francis W. Hughes, For many years, Chairman of the Democratic State Committee. of Pennsylvania, Rodman M. Price, Formerly Representative in Congress from California; since, Democratic Governor of New Jerss immaterial, and, practically, nothing to us), let us, then, save the country — let us do that which is most likely to reunite the States, speedily and peacefully. Arguments nearly identical with the foregoing were used to like purpose by Gov. Seymour, of New York, but in private conversations only. of New Jersey, etc., etc. Kindred in idea, though diverse in its mode of operations, was an association organized at New York during this month, naming itself the American Society for promoti
ys he would rather fight the battle with you as the standard-bearer, in 1860, than under the auspices of any other leader. The feeling and judgment of Mr. S. in this relation is, I am confident, rapidly gaining ground in New England. Our people are looking for the Coming Man. One who is raised by all the elements of his character above the atmosphere ordinarily breathed by politicians. A man really fitted for this emergency by his ability, courage, broad statesmanship and patriotism. Col. Seymour (Tho's. 11.) arrived here this morning, and expressed his views in this relation in almost the identical language used by Mr. Shepley. It is true that, in the present state of things at Washington, and throughout tile country, no man can I predict what changes two or three months may bring forth. Let me suggest that, in the morning debates of Congress, full justice seems to me not to have been done to the Democracy of the North. I do not believe that our friends at the South have any j
8; his incredulity, 429; his correspondence with the Rebel Commissioners, 430 to 432; letter from Judge Campbell to, 433-4; receives a final letter from the Commissioners, 435-6; replies to Gov. Hicks's requests, 467; see Appended Notes, 632. Seymour, Col., allusion to, 512. Seymour, Horatio, at the Tweddle Convention, 388; his speech there. 390-91; 396; is understood to favor an adhesion to the South, 439-9. Shadrack, a fugitive slave, 215. Shambaugh, Isaac N., on Missouri, 590. Seymour, Horatio, at the Tweddle Convention, 388; his speech there. 390-91; 396; is understood to favor an adhesion to the South, 439-9. Shadrack, a fugitive slave, 215. Shambaugh, Isaac N., on Missouri, 590. Shannon, Wilson, of Ohio. appointed Governor of Kansas. 240; his speech at Westport, Mo., 240; 242; calls out 5,000 men to reduce Lawrence, 243. Shaw, Henry, vote on Missouri Compromise, 80. Shawnee Mission, Kansas Border Ruffian Legislature at, 239; its enactments there, 239-40. Shays's insurrection, 20. Sherman, Roger, 35; remarks in debate on the Constitution, 430; 444; 445. Sherman, John, of Ohio, 241; for Speaker, 304-5; his Peace proposition, 374; 564; remarks, 566-7.