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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 15 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Charles J. Seymour or search for Charles J. Seymour in all documents.

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reinforcement was too late to participate in the affair. The volunteers from Portland, however, were spoiling for a fight, and in the absence of other opportunity desired to shoot the prisoners I held (who, they alleged, had killed a man named Seymour), and proceeded to make their arrangements to do so, only desisting on being informed that the Indians were my prisoners, subject to the orders of Colonel Wright, and would be protected to the last by my detachment. Not long afterward Seymour tSeymour turned up safe and sound, having fled at the beginning of the attack on the Cascades, and hid somewhere in the thick underbrush until the trouble was over, and then made his way back to the settlement. The next day I turned my prisoners over to Colonel Wright, who had them marched to the upper landing of the Cascades, where, after a trial by a military commission, nine of them were sentenced to death and duly hanged. I did not see them executed, but was afterward informed that, in the absence
ery D, Lieutenant William Munk. Fifth United States, Battery B, Captain Henry A. Du Pont. cavalry: Brigadier-General Alfred T. A. Torbert. escort: First Rhode Island, Major William H. Turner, Jr. first division: Brigadier-General Wesley Merritt. first brigade: Brigadier-General George A. Custer. First Michigan, Colonel Peter Stagg. Fifth Michigan, Major Smith H. Hastings. Sixth Michigan, Colonel James H. Kidd. Seventh Michigan, Major Melvin Brewer. Twenty-fifth New York, Major Charles J. Seymour. Second brigade: Colonel Thomas C. Devin. Fourth New York (1), Major August Hourand. Fourth New York (2), Major Edward Schwartz. Sixth New York, Major William E. Beardsley. Ninth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel George S. Nichols. Nineteenth New York (First Dragoons), Colonel Alfred Gibbs. Seventeenth Pennsylvania, Major Coe Durland. reserve brigade: Colonel Charles R. Lowell, Jr. Second Massachusetts, Lieutenant-Colonel Casper Crowninshield. Sixth Pennsylvania, At Pleasant Va
ugh Ewell's line. Richardson had told me just how the main body of the enemy was posted, so as Seymour's division arrived I directed General Wright to put it on the right of the road, while Wheaton's men, coming up all hot and out of breath, promptly formed on Seymour's left. Both divisions thus aligned faced southwest toward Sailor's Creek, and the artillery of the corps being massed to the lyed longer the enemy might effect his escape toward Farmville — the general attack was begun. Seymour and Wheaton, moving forward together, assailed the enemy's front and left, and Stagg's brigade,t of Anderson. The enemy, seeing little chance of escape, fought like a tiger at bay, but both Seymour and Wheaton pressed him vigorously, gaining ground at all points except just to the right of the road, where Seymour's left was checked. Here the confederates burst back on us in a countercharge, surging down almost to the creek, but the artillery, supported by Getty, who in the mean time had