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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Isaac G. Seymour or search for Isaac G. Seymour in all documents.

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sidering the respectable and wealthy party back of it—the first response came through a call, published in the papers, for a Bell and Everett ratification meeting to be held on May 30th. This call was signed by an imposing number of citizens, prominent in every branch of the public interest. Among the names subscribed were found those of Randell Hunt and Christian Roselius, eminent members of the bar; Moses Greenwood, banker; John R. Conway, afterward mayor; W. H. C. King, journalist; I. G. Seymour, editor of the Bulletin; Thomas Sloo, merchant; F. A. Lumsden, editor of the Picayune; W. O. Denegre, lawyer; E. T. Parker, sheriff of Orleans parish; and, to conclude with a war name, J. B. Walton, to be veteran major of the Washington Artillery when the bugle should sound for battle, and the gallant colonel of that superb battalion on fields not less hard-fought than glorious. At this meeting, with all their voices for Bell and Everett, appeared for the first time the Young Bell Rin
ng the drum beat, they struck tents with shouts of joy and took up a quickstep. Beauregard was posted somewhere ahead—that was what the Washington artillery on their caissons had gaily said—somewhere on the road to Washington. Louisiana showed a considerable forge in this campaign, beginning with the battle of July 18, 1861, and culminating in the picturesque victory of First Manassas on the 21st. At that time there were present in Beauregard's army the Sixth Louisiana volunteers, Col. I. G. Seymour; First Special battalion, Maj. C. R. Wheat; Seventh regiment, Col. Harry T. Hays; Eighth regiment, Col. H. B. Kelly; and the Washington artillery, Maj. John B. Walton. On the 18th the Louisianians, Ewell's brigade, occupying position in vicinity of the Union Mills ford, included Seymour's regiment. Wheat's battalion was with Evans, who, holding the left flank, watched over the Stone bridge across Bull run. Hays' Seventh was attached to Early's brigade; Kelly, just arrived, was or
ed, a most courageous and capable officer. The loss of Coppens' battalion was reported at 10 killed and 41 wounded; of the Fourteenth, 51 killed and 192 wounded, a total ranking among the heaviest regimental losses of the campaign; while Maurin's gunners had a loss of 4. The killed of the Fourteenth included Captains Bradley and Scott, and Lieutenants Fisher and Garrish. Ewell's division was first in battle at Gaines' Mill, on the 27th. Taylor being disabled by severe illness, Col. Isaac G. Seymour commanded the Louisiana brigade. In the afternoon, at the charge at Cold Harbor, he was shot from his horse and died in a few minutes. Here also fell Maj. Robert Wheat, known familiarly as Bob Wheat, cheeriest of souls, and not a stranger to the enemy, who remembered him as the chief of the Tigers at Manassas. The Louisiana brigade fought desperately at Gaines' Mill, attacked in front and flank, and for hours without reinforcements, and lost 32 killed and 136 wounded from their ra
e in the army of Northern Virginia, went to Virginia in 1861 as lieutenant-colonel of the Ninth Louisiana volunteers, and upon the promotion of Col. Richard Taylor became colonel. With the First Louisiana brigade he participated in the Valley campaign of Stonewall Jackson, and at Winchester General Taylor reported: Colonel Stafford led his regiment into action with the most distinguished bravery. In the Seven Days battles, during the disability of General Taylor and after the death of Colonel Seymour, he took command at Cold Harbor and continued to lead the brigade during that campaign. When the Second Louisiana brigade was organized in the summer of 1862 he, being senior colonel, was first in command. He served in this capacity with distinction at Cedar Run or Slaughter's mountain, and in the Second Manassas campaign he was again called on to command the brigade when General Starke took command of the division on the 28th of August. In the desperate fighting at the railroad cut