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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 15 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 23 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 1, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Shackleford or search for Shackleford in all documents.

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ourt-House. At noon they again took up the line of march, and this evening the advance was in sight of Munson's Hill. The enemy's cavalry followed them in the distance, but made no attack, and the entire movement was being accomplished in excellent orders (Doc. 104.) A large force of rebel cavalry under General Scott, entered and occupied Versailles, Ky.--Louisville Journal, September 1. A fight took place at Morganfield, Ky., between a force of Union troops under command of Col. Shackleford, Eighth Kentucky cavalry, and a body of rebel guerrillas under Col. A. R. Johnson, resulting in a rout of the latter with considerable loss. A. S. Paddock, Acting Governor of the Territory of Nebraska, apprehending an attack by the hostile Indians on the frontier settlements of that territory, issued a proclamation calling upon the citizens of the organized counties of the territory to enroll themselves in accordance with previous instructions, and that all organized companies shou
ative. A skirmish took place to-day at Barbee's Cross-Roads, Virginia, between a force of Union troops, under the command of General Pleasanton, and a detachment of General Stuart's rebel cavalry, resulting in the retreat of the latter with considerable loss.--(Doc. 29.) Salem, Virginia, was occupied by the National cavalry under General Bayard.--Curran Pope, Colonel of the Fifteenth regiment of Kentucky volunteers, died at Danville, Kentucky.--This day, while a battalion of General Shackleford's cavalry, under the command of Major Holloway, was moving from Henderson to Bowling Green, Kentucky, a party of rebel guerrillas under Johnson attempted to surprise them, on the Greenville road, about seven miles from Madisonville. The attack was promptly met by the National forces, and the rebels were routed with the loss of eight killed and a large number wounded and captured. Colonel Fowler, who commanded the guerrillas, was among the killed.--Indianapolis Journal. This day
December 14. Between two and three o'clock this afternoon, the forces of Longstreet turned upon and attacked the pursuing column of cavalry under General Shackleford. The line of battle was formed at Bean Station, Tenn., on the Cumberland Gap and Morristown road; and a fight ensued which continued until nightfall, when the rebels succeeded in driving the Nationals about half a mile. Colonels Wolford, Graham, Foster, and others were engaged. The musketry fire was very heavy. The whole movement was made with a well-contrived plan to cut off and capture General Shackleford and command; and a heavy force of rebel cavalry moved down the left bank of the Holston River, with the intention of crossing at Kelly's Ford and coming in his rear. This portion of the programme was checked by General Ferrero, who sent the brigade of General Humphrey to hold the ford. The rebels fired across the river with artillery upon the brigade, but with little effect.--(Doc. 36.) The United St