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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 15 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 23 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 1, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Shackleford or search for Shackleford in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
to Morgan's, under General Hobson, Composed of the forces of Generals Hobson, Wolford, and Shackleford, consisting of Ohio, Michigan, and Kentucky troops. These had formed a junction at Lebanon oh, when General Judah's cavalry struck Morgan's flank, the head of Hobson's column, under General Shackleford, struck his rear, and two armed vessels, near, Buffington Island, opened upon his front. enveloped by militia and Home Guards, near New Lisbon, the capital of Columbiana County, with Shackleford's pursuing column in their rear, and compelled to surrender, July 26, 1868. first informally to Major Rae, of Shackleford's cavalry, and, half an hour later, formally to Shackleford himself: Thus ended, in death or captivity, the career of more than four thousand bold raiders, who entered tShackleford himself: Thus ended, in death or captivity, the career of more than four thousand bold raiders, who entered the Free-labor States three weeks before, excepting a little more than three hundred, who escaped at Belleville, under Colonel Adam R. Johnson, and found refuge in Southwestern Virginia. Morgan and s
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
e Confederates broke and fled, leaving their dead on the field. They were pursued and struck from time to time by General Shackleford and his cavalry, and driven out of the State. The latter captured a fort at Zollicoffer, burned the long bridge aationals lost about one hundred men in killed and wounded. The loss of the Confederates was a little greater. When Shackleford returned from the chase, he took post at Jonesboroa with a part of his command, while another portion, under Wilcox, eand fifty men, four guns, and thirty-six wagons. This disaster created great alarm at, Jonesboroa and Greenville, and Shackleford's troops at those places fled back in great haste to Bull's Gap. At the same time, Jones's troops, not doubting ShackShackleford's horsemen would be after them in heavy force, were flying as swiftly toward the Virginia line, in the opposite direction. In a short space of time there was a wide space of country between the belligerents. While Burnside was thus engage
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 10: the last invasion of Missouri.--events in East Tennessee.--preparations for the advance of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
e Armies of the Republic. On the retirement of Longstreet from Knoxville See page 175. and his withdrawal toward Virginia, he was pursued by cavalry under Shackleford, Wolford, Graham, and Foster, into Jefferson County, where, near Bean's Station, on the Morristown and Cumberland Gap road, he turned Dec. 14, 1863. sharply upursuers. A brisk conflict was kept up until night, when the Nationals had been pushed back nearly a mile. The contest was indecisive, but somewhat sanguinary, Shackleford, who was in chief command of the pursuers, losing about two hundred men. Longstreet's loss, it was computed, was much greater. He sought, during the struggle, to strike Shackleford in the rear, by sending a force down the left bank of the Holston, to cross at Kelly's Ford, and come up from the west. The vigilant General Ferrero prevented this movement, by sending General Humphrey to hold that ford. Longstreet, being unable to follow up his advantage acquired at Bean's Station, on accou