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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 15 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 23 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 1, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Shackleford or search for Shackleford in all documents.

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ross--330 having got away — when Gens. Hobson and Shackleford, in command of a division of their pursuers, wereely accessible bluff, where they were summoned by Shackleford to surrender. They asked an hour for considerati8th Ill.9,262 Including Cols. Payne, 4th Ohio, Shackleford, 6th Ky., and Armstrong, 93d Ohio, with many othennessee. To this end, he impelled Sept. 5. Gen. Shackleford directly on the rear of Cumberland gap; on whirth; Burnside following in person two days behind Shackleford, who made a forced march of 60 miles in 52 hours, flour was burned Sept. 7. by two companies of Shackleford's men, who crept through his lines and fired it unumber, with a loss to our side of barely 100. Shackleford now took post at Jonesboroa, with a part of his c such a panic at Jonesborough and Greenville that Shackleford's men raced back to Bull's gap, 18 miles, while Jgood time in the opposite direction, fearing that Shackleford would be upon them in overwhelming force if they
more ; and Forrest left not a moment too soon. He made his way back to Mississippi unharmed. In East Tennessee, Gen. Longstreet's withdrawal into Virginia, after his failure at Knoxville, was at first closely pursued by our cavalry under Shackleford, on whom he turned Dec. 14, 1863. at Bean's station, near Morristown, and a spirited fight ensued, with no decided result; but Shackleford does not appear to have hurried Longstreet thereafter. Wheeler, with 1,200 mounted men, struck Shackleford does not appear to have hurried Longstreet thereafter. Wheeler, with 1,200 mounted men, struck Dec. 28. a supply train from Chattanooga to Knoxville, guarded by Col. Siebert, near Charlestown, on the Hiwassee, andl had easily captured it — Siebert having but 100 men — when Col. Long, 4th Ohio cavalry, came to his aid with 150 more cavalry and Col. Laibold's 2d Missouri infantry; wherewith he quickly retook the train, and hurled the raiders back on the road to Georgia, with a loss of 41 killed or wounded and 123 prisoners. We lost but 16. Gen. S. D. Sturgis, commanding our advance east
s), battle of, 141 to 149; losses sustained at, 148. Seward, Hon. William H., on the Slave-Trade, 237; murderously assaulted by Payne, 750. Seymour, Gen. Truman, at Gaines's Mill, 156; succeeds Gen. McCall, 163; commands at South Mountain, 198; operates in Florida, 529; defeated at Olustee, 531; captured at the Wilderness, 569. Seymour, Horatio, elected Gov. of New York, 254; on the crisis, 499-500; addresses New York rioters, 506; urges the President to suspend drafting, 507. Shackleford, Gen., routed at Jonesboroa, Tenn., by W. E. Jones, 430. Shaeffer, Col., killed at Stone River, 274. Sharpsburg, near Antietam, fighting around, 208. Shaw, Col. Robert G., 54th Mass., killed at Fort Wagner. 477. Shelby, Gen., raids into Missouri, 453; is worsted by Carr near St. Charles, 554; captures most of the 54th Illinois, 555; pursues Ewing, 558. Shelbyville (or Tullahoma), position of Bragg's army, 404; Rosecrans advances to, 410. Shenandoah, Valley of the, scene