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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 6 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 1 Browse Search
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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 13: occupations in 1863; exchange of prisoners. (search)
by placing the rebel officers held by us in a condition identical, as nearly as possible, as to shelter, clothing, fuel, and food, with that of our soldiers at Richmond, with notice to the Confederate authorities that any alleviation of the condition of our men, duly certified to us, would at once be followed by a corresponding difference in favor of their prisoners in our hands. The Secretary of War, feeling deeply the hardships of our captured soldiers, approved of the suggestion, Gen. J. W. Shaffer. and gave me permission to carry the plan into execution. This I proposed to do by placing Confederate officers to the number of some three thousand, either upon Hatteras Bank or at Sewall's Point near Fortress Munroe, both of which were nearly isothermal with Richmond in climate, and there treating them with scrupulous exactness to the same shelter, clothing, and fare which our men received, furnishing them while thus faring, with plenty of pens and paper, and every facility for comm
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 14: in command of the Army of the James. (search)
ole country. But, notwithstanding his opinion, General Meigs most earnestly and zealously aided our enterprise, and allowed me to procure in my own way all the transportation I deemed necessary to move the army and its supplies. But it was impossible to obtain sufficient transportation to take with us all the supply trains of the army, and it was some days before our whole trains got up, although every exertion was made by Colonel Biggs, chief quartermaster of the department, and Col. J. Wilson Shaffer, my chief of staff, to whose powers of business organization the country is largely indebted for a movement of troops which, for numbers, celerity, distance, and secrecy, was never before equalled, in any particular, in the history of war. On the 30th of April I received from General Grant my final orders, See Appendix No. 23. to start my forces on the night of the 4th of May so as to get up James River as far as possible by daylight the next morning, and to push on with the gr
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 19: observations upon matters connected with the War. (search)
and in the Army of the James. A brave and gallant young officer, he did his duty thoroughly and acceptably wherever he was called. At my request and by the designation of General McClellan, there was added to my staff at New Orleans as engineer, Gen. Godfrey Weitzel, in commendation of whom as an officer and a loyal friend I can say no more than has been said of him in previous chapters. He also died while serving as brigadier-general in the regular army. While at New Orleans, Col. J. W. Shaffer, a personal friend of Mr. Lincoln, was detailed to me as chief quartermaster, in which capacity he served upon my staff. He also went with me to the Army of the James, and was there promoted to be chief of my staff. He served as such until he went home in the summer of 1864 suffering with a disease which afterwards caused his death, having been appointed governor of Utah Territory. His services, although not of a character that makes men so distinguished in a campaign as to find a p
714, 716, 729, 754, 832, 833, 8:7, 914, 1007; recommends that one of the Twiggs swords be given to Butler, 878-879; Halleck's position with, 879. Lincoln, Abraham, appoints Strong Major-General, 891; appoints Kinsman Lieutenant-Colonel, 893; Shaffer a personal friend of, 894; appoints Governor of Louisiana, 896; Butler retains confidence of, 902; proposition to Confederate commissioners, 902; on the negro question, 903; canal across Isthmus of Darien suggested, 904-907; at City Point, 908; resignation, 537, 570; orders English pilots released, 849; Butler's proposition referred to, 907; thrown from carriage, 908; assaulted, 908; negotiations with England, 962; reference to, 1007. Seymour, Governor, reference to, 758. Shaffer, Col. J. W., valuable services of, 639; on Butler's staff, 894; at Newburyport, 404. Shaw, Lemuel, Esq., on Charlestown annexation case, 1001; Butler's last act toward, 1002. Shenandoah Valley, Sheridan in, 901. Shepley, Geo. F., anecdote of,
d; tried before Judge Kinney, seven are convicted of murder in the second degree......March, 1863 Gov. James Duane Doty dies......June 13, 1865 University of Deseret at Salt Lake City, chartered 1850, organized......March 8, 1869 Gov. J. Wilson Shaffer by proclamation forbids the review of the Nauvoo Legion of 13,000 men......Sept. 15, 1870 Vernon H. Vaughan succeeds Governor Shaffer, who dies......October, 1870 Zion's Co-operative Mercantile Institution incorporated......Dec. 1, Governor Shaffer, who dies......October, 1870 Zion's Co-operative Mercantile Institution incorporated......Dec. 1, 1870 Companies of the Nauvoo Legion are dispersed by federal authority......July 4, 1871 Brigham Young, ordered to be tried for bigamy, escapes......1871 Brigham Young surrenders for trial; proceedings annulled by the Supreme Court......1872 Brigham Young resigns temporal power......April 10, 1873 Brigham Young again indicted for polygamy......October, 1874 Adjudged to support one of his wives while she sues for divorce, March; imprisoned in his own house for non-compliance, No
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Utah, State of (search)
e. habitants, the legislature framed a constitution for the State of Deseret, and application was afterwards frequently made for its admission into the Union. without success till 1896, when it was regularly admitted, with an area of 84,928 square miles. Territorial governors Brigham Youngassumes office1851 Alfred Cummingassumes office1857 John W. Dawsonassumes office1861 Stephen S. Hardingassumes office1862 James Duane Dotyassumes office1863 Charles Durkeeassumes office1865 J. Wilson Shafferassumes office1870 Vernon H. Vaughnassumes office1870 George L. Woodsassumes office1871 S B Axtellassumes office1874 George W. Emeryassumes office1875 Eli H. Murrayassumes office1879 Caleb W. Westassumes office1886 Arthur L. Thomasassumes office1889 Caleb W. Westassumes office1893 State Governor. Heber M. Wellsassumes office1896 United States Senators. Name. No. of Congress.Date. Frank J. Cannon54th to 55th 1896 to 1899 Joseph L. Rawlins54th to — 1897 to — The soil