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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
sted of maize meal and bananas, but an English beggar would have disdained to touch it. Our salt was nothing better than pulverised mud. I was not likely to suffer from colds, catarrh, and pneumonia; but the ague with its differing intensities was always with me. My bedding consisted of a rubber sheet and rug over a pile of leaves or grass. I possessed certain rights of manhood, but only so long as I had the nerve to cause them to be respected. My literature was limited to the Bible, Shakespeare, and a few choice authors, but my mind was not wrung by envy, scandal, disparagement, and unfairness; and my own thoughts and hopes were a perpetual solace. It is difficult for anyone who has not undergone experiences similar to ours to understand the amount of self-control each had to exercise, for fifteen hours every day, amid such surroundings as ours. The contest between human dispositions, tempers, prejudices, habits, natures, and the necessity for self-command, were very disturb
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.31 (search)
d reflects, loses illusions faster than he who stays at home. There are nevertheless some illusions, which, when lost, he bitterly regrets. To-day, I can feel comfortably at home in almost any country; and can fully appreciate the truth of Shakespeare's words, that To a wise man, all places that the eye of Heaven visits are ports and happy havens. Yet I sympathise still with that belief of my youth, that Wales, being my native-land, possessed for me superior charms to any other. Had I oul is deflected from its vigorous course by excess of shameful ease. Joy's Soul lies in the doing! The truth which lies in this verse explains that which has caused many a personality to become illustrious. It is an old subject in poetry. Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Longfellow, and many more have rung the changes, or expressed the idea, in verse. Milton, though troubled with blindness and domestic misery, was happy in the lofty scenes conjured up by his poetic imagination, and ther
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
d. But as these virtues procured for him the affection of the good, so they weakened his authority among the lovers of turbulence. Duncan in the seventh year of his reign, was waylaid by Macbeth and killed, but not in the manner as stated by Shakespeare. Duncan married a daughter of Siward, Earl of Northumberland under Hardicanute and Edward the Confessor. Under the latter reign Siward assisted the Crown in resisting the rebellion of Earl Godwin; and such was the vigor of his movements that Godwin was defeated, and, for a time, obliged to quit the kingdom. After this, Siward gained much reputation by his military operations in Scotland against Macbeth. Knight thus speaks of him: This was the Siward of Shakespeare; war-like Siward; old Siward, the protector of his grandson Malcolm, the son of the murdered Duncan, the father of young Siward, who perished on the battlefield where Macbeth fell. Where were his wounds? said the stout old Earl. In the front. -- Then I would wi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bacon, Delia, 1811- (search)
Bacon, Delia, 1811- Author; born in Tallmadge, O., Feb. 2, 1811; a sister of Dr. Leonard Bacon (q. v.). She published in 1857 The Philosophy of Shakespeare's plays, in which she put forth the hypothesis that these plays were not written by Shakespeare, but by Sir Francis Bacon. She died in Hartford, Conn., Sept. 2, 185,9. Bacon, Delia, 1811- Author; born in Tallmadge, O., Feb. 2, 1811; a sister of Dr. Leonard Bacon (q. v.). She published in 1857 The Philosophy of Shakespeare's plays, in which she put forth the hypothesis that these plays were not written by Shakespeare, but by Sir Francis Bacon. She died in Hartford, Conn., Sept. 2, 185,9.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bryant, William Cullen, 1794-1878 (search)
eventieth year. in 1864, his birthday was celebrated by a festival at the Century Club by prominent literary men. His translations of Homer into English blank verse were commended as the best rendering of the Epics in his native tongue ever made. His occasional speeches and more formal orations are models of stately style, sometimes enlivened by quiet humor. In prose composition Mr. Bryant was equally happy as in poetry in the choice of pure and elegant English words, with great delicacy of fancy pervading the whole. His last poem was published in the Sunday-School Times, Philadelphia, Feb. 22, 1878, on the subject of Washington, and written at the request of the editor of that paper. At the time of his death he was engaged with Sydney Howard Gay in the preparation of a History of the United States. He had also just completed, with the assistance of the late Evart A. Duykinck, a new and carefully annotated edition of Shakespeare's works. He died in New York City, June 12. 1878.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dana, Richard Henry, 1787-1879 (search)
he Review that Bryant's Thanatopsis was published in its pages, the author being then unknown. In 1821 the first volume of The idle man was published. It was unprofitable, and Mr. Dana dropped it. In it he published stories and essays from his own pen. In the same year he contributed to the New York Review (then under the care of Mr. Bryant) his first poem of much pretension, The dying raven. In 1827 his most celebrated poetical production, The buccaneer, was published, with some minor poems. Of that production Wilson, of Blackwood's magazine, wrote, It is by far the most powerful and original of American poetical compositions. Mr. Dana's writings were always marked by great delicacy and grace and strong individuality. Among his most valuable prose compositions were a series of lectures upon Shakespeare, ten in number, delivered in the winter of 1839-40 in the cities of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. After 1833 Mr. Dana wrote but little. He died in Boston, Feb. 2, 1879.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davenant, Sir William, 1605-1668 (search)
Davenant, Sir William, 1605-1668 Dramatist and poet; born in Oxford, England, in 1605; son of an innkeeper, at whose house Shakespeare often stopped while on his journeys between Stratford and London, and who noticed the boy. Young Davenant left college without a degree. Shoving much literary talent, he was encouraged in writing plays by persons of distinction, and on the death of Ben Jonson in 1637 he was made poet-laureate. He adhered to the royal cause during the civil war in England, with French men, women, and children, he sailed for Virginia. The ship was captured by a parliamentary cruiser, and the passengers were landed in England, where the life of Sir William was spared, it is believed, by the intervention of John Milton, the poet, who was Cromwell's Latin secretary. Sir William had a strong personal resemblance to Shakespeare, and it was currently believed that he was a natural son of the great dramatist. This idea Sir William encouraged. He died in April, 1668.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davis, Cushman Kellogg, 1838- (search)
Davis, Cushman Kellogg, 1838- Statesman; born in Henderson, N. Y., June 16, 1838; Cushman Kellogg Davis. graduated at the University of Michigan in 1857; studied law and began practice in Waukesha, Wis. During the Civil War he served three years in the Union army. In 1865 he removed to St. Paul, Minn. He was a member of the Minnesota legislature in 1867; United States district attorney for Minnesota in 1868-73; governor of Minnesota in 1874-75; and elected to the United States Senate in 1887, 1893, and 1899. For several years he was chairman of the Senate committee on foreign relations, and familiarity with the international affairs of the United States led to his appointment as a member of the commission to negotiate peace with Spain after the war of 1898. He published The law in Shakespeare. He died in St. Paul, Nov. 27, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Donnelly, Ignatius, 1831- (search)
Donnelly, Ignatius, 1831- Author; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 3, 1831; removed to Minnesota in 1856; elected lieutenantgovernor of the State in 1859 and 1861; Representative in Congress, 1863-69; president of the State Farmers' Alliance of Minnesota for several years; nominee of the Anti-Fusion People's party for Vice-President of the United States in 1900. He was the author of Atlantis, the Antediluvian world; The Great Cryptogram, in which he undertook to prove by a word cipher that Francis Bacon was the author of Shakespeare's plays; The American people's money, etc. He died in Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 2, 1901.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duyckinck, Evert Augustus, 1816-1878 (search)
alue. To this Evert added a supplement in 1865. His other important works are, Wit and wisdom of Sidney Smith; National portrait-gallery of eminent Americans; History of the War for the Union; History of the world from the earliest period to the present time; and Portrait-Gallery of eminent men and women of Europe and America (2 volumes). Mr. Duyckinck's latest important literary labor was in the preparation, in connection with William Cullen Bryant (q. v.), of a new and thoroughly annotated edition of Shakespeare's writings. Evert died in New York City, Aug. 13, 1878. His brother, George long, was born in New York City, Oct. 17, 1823; graduated at the University of the City of New York in 1843. Besides his assistance in the conduct of the Literary world and the preparation of the Cyclopaedia of American Literature, he published biographies of George Herbert (1858), Bishop Thomas Ken (1859), Jeremy Taylor (1860), and Bishop Latimer (1861). He died in New York City March 30, 1863.
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