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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 114 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 80 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 50 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 28 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 28 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life. You can also browse the collection for Shakespeare or search for Shakespeare in all documents.

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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, VI: in and out of the pulpit (search)
t they were spoken to them by a comrade, and she gives a vivid description of a Christmas tree which he had for poor children, an unusual and exciting event in those days. One small child who had spent a day with the minister told his parents that Mr. Higginson was a real boy; which meed of praise the latter reported with glee to his mother. The young clergyman gathered around him also a remarkable bevy of maidens who studied English poetry with him and for whom he planned a course of Shakespeare readings. These young girls assisted him in the evening school which he established for working-people. This evening school was one of the first in the country, and the experiment led to similar schools in other States. Some of these Mr. Higginson aided in establishing, as the one in Dover, New Hampshire. In his carefully kept records of the evening schools of Newburyport are the names of male and female pupils with their various employments and the factories where they worked. Even
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIII: Oldport Days (search)
thout many things. In analyzing his own style, the author noted in his journal:— I have fineness and fire, but some want of copiousness and fertility which may give a tinge of thinness to what I write . . . . What an abundance, freshness and go there is about the Beechers, for instance. They are egotistic, crotchety and personally disagreeable, and they often make fritters of English but I wish I could, without sacrificing polish, write with that exuberant and hearty zeal . . . Shakespeare may have written as the birds sing, though I doubt it—but minor writers at least have to labor for form as the painter labors—the mere inspiration of thought is not enough. . . . There must be a golden moment but also much labor within that moment. At least it is so with me, and I cannot help suspecting that it is even so with the Shakespeares. On New Year's Day, 1866, the thought first came to Colonel Higginson, while reading Hawthorne's Marble Faun, that he might write a romance, <
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
of her places. Apropos of Bettine, these passages occur in one of the diaries:— Just now I am reading Gunderode with ever-new delight: I wish there were a million volumes. Really there is not an author in the world, save Emerson and Shakespeare, from whom I have had so much and so fresh enjoyment as from the perennial Child, Bettine. Her effervescence always intoxicates me with delight; though her life flowed prematurely away in it, like champagne left uncorked. Bingen, Aug. 7. urs .. . The librarian of the great Bodleian library remembered me twenty-five years ago and says I ought to have had a degree of D. C.L. in place of some of the Colonial premiers. He spent a Sunday at Stratford and wrote:— I went to Shakespeare's church, a lovely place, and there was a very ritualistic service, a great deal of signs of the cross, etc. The rector presently announced that he would have a prayer service of thanks for an American party saved from danger at sea. After the