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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 114 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 80 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 50 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 28 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 28 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Shakespeare or search for Shakespeare in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
nter we had not even this. After church we walked in the Villa Borghese . . . . . December 20.—. . . . We visited, this morning, the remains of the Theatre of Marcellus, and of the Portico of Octavia. There is, after all, not a great deal to be seen of them; but the antiquarians are much interested about them always, because the marble plan at the Capitol shows so distinctly what they were; and everybody feels interested in what bears the name of Octavia, the sister of Augustus, whom Shakespeare has so well described in a few lines, and in Marcellus, whom Virgil has immortalized in still fewer. Antony and Cleopatra, Act II. Sc. 2, and Aeneid, Book VI. v. 884. The Theatre was begun by Julius Caesar (Dio Cass., 53-30, p. 725, and 43, 49, p. 376), but was finished by Augustus, and dedicated, A. u. c. 741, to the memory of Marcellus, who had been dead ten years (Plin., 8, 23; Suet. Aug., 29). . . . . The Portico, which Augustus built afterwards, for the accommodation and sh
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
n of George IV.; and the outlines of Flaxman for Aeschylus, interleaved in a beautiful copy of the original, and presented to the late Countess Spencer by Flaxman, with a manuscript inscription. The large paper copies of books in this room are extraordinary, both for their beauty and number, especially the folios; and the binding of all the books, without being showy, is as rich and solid as money could make it. . . . . In the Long Library is a cabinet containing the Historical Plays of Shakespeare, illustrated by Lady Lucan, Lord Spencer's grandmother. I looked there among the early Italian and English books, where almost nothing was wanting that could be asked after or thought of. The whole number of volumes in the library is about 110,000, no doubt the finest private library in the world, and all collected by the late Earl. The collection of rarities is said to have cost above £ 200,000. And so the present Earl finds it expedient to economize, which he does very cheerfully.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
t's Life of Sir Walter, about which you ask. It is a most interesting book, and has greatly interested the multitudes here, who feel that Scott belongs to us as he does to you, and who thank God that Milton's language is our mother-tongue, and Shakespeare's name compatriot with our own. But the ocean that rolls between us operates like the grave on all personal and party feelings; and our thoughts and feelings towards such as Sir Walter and yourself are as impartial, at least, if not as wise and decisive, as the voice of posterity. We were, therefore, pained by some parts of this book . . . . To the admirers of Sir Walter in America, who knew him only as they know Shakespeare, part of what is in Lockhart was an unwelcome surprise, much more so than it was in England, where the weaknesses of his character were known to many. Sir Walter, therefore, does not stand, in the moral estimation of this country, where he did. Perhaps Lockhart could not avoid this, certainly he could not a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
uare mile belonging now to the territory of the United States be cursed with slavery, which is not at this present moment cursed with it. Of course I do not speak of Cuba or Mexico. I only pray that they may never be added to our Confederacy. Nor will they, except with the consent of Europe. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, June 21, 1858. I hope the second edition of Shall and Will An admirable treatise by Sir E. Head. may come soon, and that there will be plenty of quotations from Shakespeare in it. There ought to be, after the pains you took. The Bible, too,—King James's,—will furnish the best of illustrations. I am not certain but that it is the constant use of this book that has kept us so very exact about Shall and Will, from the Puritan times down. At any rate, we are all right in New England. I never knew a person among us—who was born here, or who was bred in our schools— to make a mistake in the use of these two idiomatic auxiliaries. Indeed, I do not think I hea
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
s value. You are to help her, and I am very glad of it, for I cannot . . . . The principal matter, of course, is the Shakespeare collection. She says that Rodd told her husband fifteen years ago that it was the fifth most important Shakespeare Library in the world. It must, I suppose, be higher on the list now. At any rate, there will be nothing like it in this country for many a year, if there ever is; and whoever on this side of the Atlantic wants to write carefully and well about Shakespeare or the old English drama, must sit down by the Barton books and study his subject there, or else go to England. But I think Mrs. Barton is not only a very winning and attractive person, but that she has in her character a great deal of her mother, who was one of the most intelligent and acute women I ever knew, and of her father, who made the Code for Louisiana, and who, as General Jackson's Secretary of State, wrote the famous proclamation. I think, therefore, that she needs little h
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
I. 478. Seville, I. 237-241; Alcazar, 238, 240; Cathedral, 238, 239; people of, 239, 240. Seymour, Mr., I. 447. Shakespeare, study of, I. 394; Tieck's reading of, 473, 477, 482; Schlegel's translation of, 468, 483 Sharon, Mass., E. Billing, 80; takes private courses on Dante, 85; the Fine Arts, Statistics, and the Spirit of the Times, 86; never parts from Shakespeare, Milton, Dante, and the Greek Testament. 86; admiration for Shakespeare and Milton, 148; in Paris, studies French lanShakespeare and Milton, 148; in Paris, studies French language and literature, and the Langue Romane, with Le Chevalier, Roquefort, and Raynouard, 131, and it. 487: in Rome, studies antiquities with Nibby, I. 171, and Italian, 172, 173: after accepting professorship in Harvard College, decides to go to Sp245, 249, 250, 289, 361; health, I. 383; industry, 383; methodical habits, 385 note; studies Dante, 85, 394, 475 note; Shakespeare, 394, 473 note; Milton, 394; resigns professorship, 399; second visit to Europe, 400-411, II. 1-183; for ten years aft