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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 114 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 80 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 50 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 28 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 28 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Shakespeare or search for Shakespeare in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
made the strongest appeal to the imagination and sympathies of her sons. To stand by as a neutral would have been to wear the badge of confessed dishonor. At the thought of invasion either of their homes or their liberties, there sprang to the hearts of these cavaliers and the sturdy yeomanry of the mountain and the plain, the inspiring words of the poet of their fatherland: In our halls is hung— Armory of the invincible knights of old; We must be free or die, who speak the tongue That Shakespeare spoke; the faith and morals hold Which Milton held—In everything we are sprung Of earth's first blood, have titles manifold. Prophetic warning. The prophetic warning of her statesmen as to the terrors which would mark the conflict, were more than realized in her desolated homes, her impoverished people, and the myriad graves of her sons that marked the face of the Commonwealth; and yet when all was over, and standing in the midst of her desolation, the figure which represented the t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Preston Johnston. (search)
1890 he printed The Prototype of Hamlet, a series of lectures delivered at the Tulane University, which have been very favorably received by Shakespearian scholars. Owing to the bankruptcy of the publisher at the moment of its issue, this volume was never offered for sale, and only a small number of copies were printed. Its thesis is a paradox which has found favor with many lawyers, but it is not cheerfully accepted by the worshipers of the great bard. Colonel Johnston, however, ranks Shakespeare as the greatest of all writers, and regards the Baconian theory as absurd. Colonel Johnston has delivered a large number of addresses before various universities and other educational assemblies. These addresses have been widely noticed as giving a correct and vivid picture of what is called the Old South, and also of the conditions in the New South. The manly and earnest tone of the speaker, and his profound philosophical observation, with his estimate of what should be done for So