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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 114 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 80 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 50 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 28 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 28 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 18, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Shakespeare or search for Shakespeare in all documents.

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y, put into one mass and boiled down, would not furnish an amalgam that could be compared to the most indifferent of them. How many Popes and McClellan would be take to make one Lee or Jackson? This superiority of the Southern mind on the Northern was felt in the war of the Revolution and continued to be felt as long as the two sections constituted one people. The North felt it, if it did not acknowledge it, and experienced in the presence of the South the same uneasy feeling which Shakespeare makes Augustus confess that he felt in the presence of Auguste. The North was over-crowed by the South, and felt itself compelled to submit with however had a grace, to a superiority implanted by nature itself, and not to be over . It was the presence of the South in the grand council of the country that kept together the elements of the Government. Assault as it withdrew, it became palpable to the World that the North was utterly incapable of old government. Liberty was overturned in