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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 114 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 80 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 50 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 38 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 28 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 28 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Shakespeare or search for Shakespeare in all documents.

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o succeed invariably, and that one was what he calls the "Shakespearian test. " It is explained in the address of Hamlet to his mother, when he is endeavoring to remove the impression, under which she labored, that he was mad. He says: --"put me to the test, And I the matter will reword, which madness. Would gambol from." To "reword the matter" is to repeat what he had said before. Sir Henry says that no madman can do this; at least, that he had never seen one who could. Shakespeare, it seems, knew more about madness than all the doctors that had ever treated it. It is probable that this treatise of Sir Henry Halford may be well known to the profession here. If it be, we should think it would be worth while to apply this test, after reading more about it, and understanding it better than we can pretend to do after so great a lapse of time since we read it. The experiment would be curious and harmless, even though it might be productive of no good. Sir Henry Halford