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e Eighty-third Pennsylvania and Sixteenth Michigan in on the left. McQuade sent the Sixty-second Pennsylvania, Col. Black, in the timber on the extreme right, deployed mainly as skirmishers, and advancing rapidly; also the Ninth Massachusetts, Col. Cass, on the left of the Eighty-third. The Fourteenth New-York having relieved the Second Maine, was joined by the Thirteenth New-York, from Col. Warren's brigade, on our left supported by Berdan's Sharp-shooters, half of whom went in with their Sharpe's rifles, doing sure work at every shot, while the balance of the regiments were held in reserve. Griffin's battery now came thundering in, unlimbered and took position in a twinkling, and commenced throwing shell and shrapnel with excellent effect. The fresh regiments now pressed forward, the Eighty-third Pennsylvania advancing under several volleys, but reserving its fire for close quarters, losing but slightly. The enemy found the pressure of the Sixty-second on his left and the other
it is impossible to arrive at an accurate estimate of the number of the enemy; but this may be inferred from the number of arms thrown away, the quantity of their artillery, and the fact that a portion of their forces engaged against us were not at Corinth. Guns are heard to-night in the direction of Corinth. Gen. Hurlbut will push forward early to-morrow morning, as it is presumed General Rosecrans is harassing the rear of the enemy. My personal staff — Division Surgeon S. B. Davis, Capt. Sharpe, Lieut. Brown, A. D.C., and Capt. Hotaling, Second Illinois cavalry, and A. D.C.--were, by turns, colonels of regiments or captains of batteries, cheering and leading the men through the thickest of the fight. They always took the shortest line to danger on the field, and were always on hand when wanted. I commend them to the consideration of the Government. E. O. C. Ord, Major-General. Colonel Trumbull's report. headquarters Third Iowa infantry, camp near Bolivar, Tenn., Oct
it is impossible to arrive at an accurate estimate of the number of the enemy; but this may be inferred from the number of arms thrown away, the quantity of their artillery, and the fact that a portion of their forces engaged against us were not at Corinth. Guns are heard to-night in the direction of Corinth. Gen. Hurlbut will push forward early to-morrow morning, as it is presumed General Rosecrans is harassing the rear of the enemy. My personal staff — Division Surgeon S. B. Davis, Capt. Sharpe, Lieut. Brown, A. D.C., and Capt. Hotaling, Second Illinois cavalry, and A. D.C.--were, by turns, colonels of regiments or captains of batteries, cheering and leading the men through the thickest of the fight. They always took the shortest line to danger on the field, and were always on hand when wanted. I commend them to the consideration of the Government. E. O. C. Ord, Major-General. Colonel Trumbull's report. headquarters Third Iowa infantry, camp near Bolivar, Tenn., Oct
ng sun I have almost ever felt. We returned to our encampment in the fore part of the night, unloaded, and immediately started back to recover what horses might be left. At daylight we were at the same landing, and at ten o'clock A. M., in the swamps, where we secured forty more horses. We found killed six of the rebels, and took twenty-five prisoners, among them Capt. January and Lieut. Coxe. These men were well equipped, had fine horses, and all armed with revolvers, carbines, many Sharpe's rifles, and double-barreled shot-guns, and such spurs! to be appreciated they must be seen. The regiment was commanded by Col. Edwin Waller, and was represented to be brave and daring. It was the most wonderful rout of the war — and not an instance of five hundred well-armed and well-mounted men so thoroughly dispersed. But little may be apprehended from them in future, as it will take them a long time to equip in so good a manner. Capt. January is an old friend of mine, and he told