hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 2 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 13, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Shay or search for Shay in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

feature of their service was to bring in the companies of the Eighty-ninth New-York volunteers, whom, in the fore part of the day, we feared had fallen into the hands of the enemy, from an outpost called Red House Tower, three miles distant. As the rebels ventured out of the thickets here and there, it was exceedingly gratifying to see Major S. C. Oliver, commanding the post, send his shells bursting into their midst, soon scattering them into the woods for safety. Prisoners state that a Colonel Shay was killed by one of these shells. Every thing had gone well thus far. All the outposts had succeeded in getting in, except one at Bucker Grove. to the north-west about ten miles. It was held by one company. Every preparation was made to receive an expected attack in the morning. The freedmen shouldered the guns and relieved the guards in the city. Some of the negroes came forward and offered their services; others had a polite invitation to do so by soldiers detached for the purp