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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Pea Ridge, Ark. (search)
. Sixth Division, Major D. H. Lindsay: detachments of infantry and Gorham's battery of artillery. Division loss: w, 13; m, 34 = 47. Seventh and Ninth Divisions, Brig.-Gen. D. M. Frost: detachments of infantry and cavalry and Guibor's and MacDonald's batteries of artillery; also included the Third Brigade of Volunteers given above. Eighth Division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Rains: Infantry under Col. William H. Erwin, Lieut.-Cols. John P. Bowman, A. J. Pearcy, and Stemmons; Bledsoe's battery, and Shelby's company of cavalry. Division loss: k, 2; w, 26 = 28. McCulloch's division, Brig.-Gen. Ben. McCulloch (k), Col. E. Greer. Infantry Brigade, Col. Louis Hebert (c), Col. Evander McNair: 4th Ark., Col. Evander McNair, Lieut.-Col. Samuel Ogden; 14th Ark., Col. M. C. Mitchell; 16th Ark., Col. J. F. Hill; 17th Ark., Col. F. A. Rector; 21st Ark., Col. D. McRae; 3d Louisiana, Major W. F. Tunnard (c), Capt. W. S. Gunnell. Cavalry Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James McIntosh (k): 1st Ark. Mounted Rifles, C
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Composition and losses of the Confederate army. (search)
. Sixth Division, Major D. H. Lindsay: detachments of infantry and Gorham's battery of artillery. Division loss: w, 13; m, 34 = 47. Seventh and Ninth Divisions, Brig.-Gen. D. M. Frost: detachments of infantry and cavalry and Guibor's and MacDonald's batteries of artillery; also included the Third Brigade of Volunteers given above. Eighth Division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Rains: Infantry under Col. William H. Erwin, Lieut.-Cols. John P. Bowman, A. J. Pearcy, and Stemmons; Bledsoe's battery, and Shelby's company of cavalry. Division loss: k, 2; w, 26 = 28. McCulloch's division, Brig.-Gen. Ben. McCulloch (k), Col. E. Greer. Infantry Brigade, Col. Louis Hebert (c), Col. Evander McNair: 4th Ark., Col. Evander McNair, Lieut.-Col. Samuel Ogden; 14th Ark., Col. M. C. Mitchell; 16th Ark., Col. J. F. Hill; 17th Ark., Col. F. A. Rector; 21st Ark., Col. D. McRae; 3d Louisiana, Major W. F. Tunnard (c), Capt. W. S. Gunnell. Cavalry Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James McIntosh (k): 1st Ark. Mounted Rifles, C
ons of officers and soldiers in regard to the policy of the Government, in emancipating the slaves and of enlisting the freedmen into the army. And on several occasions I give a moment's thought to natural phenomena, which were subjects of conversation in the camp. The critical reader may, perhaps, think that I have in one instance purposely arranged my composition to show that coming events cast their shadows before. But I have not. The facts, however, show that they sometimes do. Gen. Shelby's raid through Missouri in October, 1863, affords an example. The approaching storm was indicated nearly a week before the invasion by the main force took place, and we are almost made to hear the distant rumbling of artillery carriages and caissons, and the faint tramping of marching squadrons. Should it be asked why I have allowed eighteen years to elapse before printing my chronicles, I reply because I felt that they should have a more careful and critical revision than I have bee
ory S. Foster, Seventh Missouri cavalry, who commanded our troops in the engagement, reports that he had about 800 men, and that one-third of this force were killed, wounded and missing. This was one of the most gallant fights of the war, for a small force. The enemy had 2,500 men. We marched day and night from Fort Scott to Lone Jack, to reinforce our troops, but when we arrived on the ground we were mortified to learn that the battle had been fought the day before. The enemy under Generals Shelby and Cockrell were still encamped on the field; but when we came in sight, instead of giving battle, as we anticipated they would after their recent victory, they retreated. It was about six o'clock when we came up, and General Blunt immediately commenced to form his troops in line of battle, as the enemy seemed to be making some kind of hostile movements. I was with Colonel Jewell and General Blunt, and some of his staff were near us. We expected every moment that the enemy were going
Generals Steele and Davidson. Colonel Bowen, commanding the Second Brigade, stationed at Webber's Falls above Fort Smith, has probably marched to the latter place by this time, to relieve Colonel Cloud. Unless Generals Steele and Davidson continue the pursuit of Price's army from Little Rock, it will likely either march to Fort Smith, and attack our forces there, or turn north and invade Missouri. From such information as I can obtain, it looks as if the cavalry divisions of Marmaduke and Shelby were preparing for an immediate invasion of Missouri. The country north of the Arkansas River, above Little Rock, is open to the northern line of the State, and they would meet with little or no opposition until they passed into Missouri. But as soon as they enter that State, they are not likely to find much time for rest until they leave it, for the State troops and volunteers stationed at the different points, can soon concentrate in sufficient force to keep them moving. Since Vicksburg
xter Springs the invasion of Missouri by General Shelby, with two thousand cavalry and three piecethree hundred men, and an officer belonging to Shelby's command, with about two hundred men, attackeeneral Blunt now has definite information that Shelby, Gordon and Hunter have invaded Missouri, with miles from the State line, it is thought that Shelby may turn aside and attack us here in a few dayting with General Ewing with hope of capturing Shelby's entire force. While our troops will not likhe turn affairs have taken, it is thought that Shelby will be disappointed in regard to increasing hwing's forces overtook and had a skirmish with Shelby's rear guard at Carthage, Jasper county, Missos he returns from the expedition in pursuit of Shelby's raiders. Major W. C. Ransom, of the Sixttered forces of Generals Cooper, Marmaduke and Shelby are reorganizing, and making preparations to mhe badly demoralized condition of Cooper's and Shelby's forces, we may conclude that such an army ca[8 more...]
howed a chivalrous devotion to the Union cause. When the enemy finally became too strong for him, rather than submit to rebel rule, he withdrew his forces towards southern Kansas, and nearly all his people followed him and became voluntary exiles. Now that our forces occupy the central and western portions of Arkansas, the War Department has authorized the raising of two or three more regiments from that State. The numerous desertions from the demoralized armies of Generals Cooper and Shelby, and the large numbers of Mountain Federals in different sections of the State, will enable the recruiting officers to get the complement of men for these regiments at an early day. Mountain Feds is a name given to local organizations of Union men who occupy mountain fastnesses and annoy the enemy, somewhat after the same manner that rebel guerrillas annoy our troops. There is this difference, however: Rebel guerrilla chiefs generally hold commissions from the rebel authorities, while the c
er has been slightly disturbed by the appearance of guerrilla bands in Southwest Missouri on the 3d instant. But they will probably soon find it an uncomfortable section to operate in, as most of the militia have returned to their stations since Shelby's raid, and are ready to take the field against them. At the different posts in Missouri, the horses of the State troops are generally in good condition, as they are rarely or never short of forage. I mentioned last spring, from my own observatnd Fort Smith. There are, probably, nearly three thousand State troops in southwest Missouri, and should he invade the State, they will likely soon to be able to check his movements, and put him to flight. The energy with which they pressed General Shelby last October, and their success in capturing his artillery, has given them great confidence in their ability to meet an invading force on the field. General Blunt is still at Fort Smith, but apparently without a command, much to the regre
September 27. Captain Parker, of the First Arkansas infantry, with seventy-five men, was attacked near Moffat's Store, in Franklin County, Arkansas, by Shelby's rebel cavalry. His loss was two killed, two wounded, and fifteen prisoners. The rebel loss was five killed and twenty wounded-among the latter, Shelby, their commander. September 27. Captain Parker, of the First Arkansas infantry, with seventy-five men, was attacked near Moffat's Store, in Franklin County, Arkansas, by Shelby's rebel cavalry. His loss was two killed, two wounded, and fifteen prisoners. The rebel loss was five killed and twenty wounded-among the latter, Shelby, their commander.
eded in carrying off all of their wounded and many of their dead. Fifteen dead rebels were found and buried. Colonel Hatch captured seventy-five prisoners, among whom was a rebel chief of artillery. A rebel force, under the command of Colonel William L. Jackson, attacked the outpost of General B. F. Kelley's army, at Bulltown, Braxton County, Va., this morning, and after a severe fight were compelled to retreat with heavy loss. They were pursued by the Union cavalry. The Union force in the engagement consisted of detachments of the Sixth and Eleventh Virginia regiments, numbering about four hundred, commanded by Captain William H. Mattingly, of the former regiment. He was dangerously wounded. The other casualties were slight. The rebel loss was sixty wounded and nine killed.--General Kelley's Despatch. A fight took place near Merrill's Crossing, Mo., between the Union troops under General Brown and the rebels under Shelby, in which the latter was defeated.--(Doc. 195.)
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