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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 22 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 22 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 21 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 8 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature. You can also browse the collection for Shelley or search for Shelley in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 3: the Philadelphia period (search)
people were subject to somnambulism and general frenzy; vast conspiracies were organized with petty aims and smaller results. Brown's books, published between 1798 and 1801, made their way across the ocean with a promptness that now seems inexplicable; they represented American literature to England. Mrs. Shel. ley in her novel of The last man founds her whole description of an epidemic, which nearly destroys the human race, on the masterly delineations of the author of Arthur Mervyn. Shelley himself recognized his obligations to Brown; and it is to be remembered that Brown himself was evidently familiar with Godwin's philosophical writings and with Caleb Williams, and that he may have drawn from Mary Wollstonecraft his advanced views as to the rights and education of women, a subject on which his first book, Alcuin, provided the earliest American protest. Undoubtedly his tales furnished a point of transition from Mrs. Radcliffe, of whom he disapproved, to the modern novel of r
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 7: the Concord group (search)
n it came to passing judgment on the details of poetry, he was sometimes whimsical; his personal favorites were apt to be swans, and, on the other hand, there were whole classes of great writers whom he hardly recognized at all. This was true of Shelley, for example, about whom he wrote though uniformly a poetic mind, he is never a poet. About prose writers his estimate was a shade more trustworthy, yet he probably never quite appreciated Hawthorne, and certainly discouraged young people from eamy, as she indeed was, then and always. When I passed, Hawthorne lifted upon me his great gray eyes, with a look too keen to seem indifferent, too shy to be sympathetic — and that was all. But it comes back to memory like that one glimpse of Shelley which Browning describes, and which he likens to the day when he found an eagle's feather. It is surprising to be asked whether Hawthorne was not physically very small. It seems at the moment utterly inconceivable that he could have been any
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 8: the Southern influence---Whitman (search)
epresenting the Southern mind, though he was born in Boston; but in reality the only Southern poet of leading quality was Sidney Lanier. Emerson said unjustly of Shelley, that although uniformly a poetic mind, he was never a poet. As to all the Southern-born poets of this country except Lanier, even as to Hayne and Timrod, the qhan are to be found anywhere else in his works. That he could criticise profoundly one much nearer to himself than Whitman is plain when Lanier comes to speak of Shelley, of whom he has a sentence that seems to be another shot in the bull's-eye of the target. He says:-- In truth, Shelley appears always to have labored under Shelley appears always to have labored under an essential immaturity; it is very possible that if he had lived a hundred years he would never have become a man; he was penetrated with modern ideas, but penetrated as a boy would be; crudely, overmuch, and with a constant tendency to the extravagant and illogical,--so I call him the Modern Boy. It remains to be said that i
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 10: forecast (search)
e English tongue. One might almost say that he wrote his list through time's telescope reversed. In the same way Ruskin rules out from his list of English poets Shelley and Coleridge. One might hope that the good taste or vanity of the great poets themselves would restore the balance of their own fame, at least, but Tennyson wromore just than England. The successive leaders of English literature, such as Lamb, Carlyle, Tennyson and Browning, were apt to be recognized first in America. Shelley tells us how utterly ignored Charles Lamb was in his prime by the English public, and Willis tells us that it was not so in America. He says in his Letters from is; and Thoreau remarks that there never yet was a definition of it so good but the poet would proceed to disregard it by setting aside all its requisitions. Shelley says that a man cannot say, I will compose poetry. The greatest poet even cannot say it, for the mind in creation is as a fading coal, which some invisible inf
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
Lamb, Charles, 171, 260, 261. Landor, Walter Savage, 124, 169. Lane Seminary, 127. Lanier, Sidney, 215-227, 264. Last leaf, Holmes's, 159. Last man, Mrs. Shelley's, 72. Leather-Stocking tales, Cooper's, 97. Leaves of grass, Whitman's, 221. Lectures on English poets, Hazlitt's, 251. Lee, Richard Henry, 44. L Serene I Fold my hands, Burroughs's, 264. Seven Pines, Battle of, 217. Sewall, Samuel, 27-35. Seward, Miss, Anna, 75, 259. Shakespeare, 1, 108, 138. Shelley, 72, 177, 183, 215, 223, 258, 261, 277, 280. Shelley, Mrs., 71. Shepard, Thomas, 19. Sherman, Gen. W. T., 101. Simms, William Gilmore, 204, 206. Skeleton iShelley, Mrs., 71. Shepard, Thomas, 19. Sherman, Gen. W. T., 101. Simms, William Gilmore, 204, 206. Skeleton in armor, Longfellow's, 142. Sketch book, Irving's, 85, 86, 90, 103. Sky Walk, Brown's, 70. Smith, Capt., John, 7. Smith, Joseph, 69. Smoke, Thoreau's, 264. Snow-bound, Whittier's, 264. Society of Friends, 146. Song of the broad-axe, Whitman's, 229. Southey, Robert, 258. Sparkling and Bright, Hoffman's, 105.