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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 199 29 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 48 2 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 15 1 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 8 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 6 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 6 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Thomas Shepard or search for Thomas Shepard in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Preface (search)
s the just self-esteem of his section with considerations like these: I will make no odious comparisons between Harvard College and other universities for the proportion of worthy men therein educated; but New England, compared with other parts of America, may certainly boast of having brought forth very many eminent men, in proportion more than any of them; and of Harvard College (herein truly a Sion College) it may be said, this and that man were bred there; of whom not the least was Mr. Thomas Shepard. The local pride, more or less justifiable, which renders tumid the periods of this energetic old Puritan, was a useful passion at a time when literature was obliged to develop independently in widely separated colonies. It is a useful passion still in a country of a hundred million inhabitants separated by such spatial and spiritual intervals as lie between Boston, New York, Richmond, Chicago, New Orleans, and San Francisco. It has stimulated the production of our innumerable local
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
ymes. Despite occasional variety of form in six-line stanza or quatrain, there is little variety of tone or style; and in all these thousands of lines scarcely a line of genuine poetry, or a single poem worth preservation in its entirety. The succession of these elegies is surprisingly unbroken for at least forty years. Both authors and subjects are in the main the divines who controlled the destinies of New England and who provided its literature. When such an elegy as that on the Rev. Thomas Shepard by the Rev. Urian Oakes, president of Harvard, is discovered amid this dreary elegiac waste, its merits are sure to be exaggerated. This poem in fifty six-line stanzas, though commonplace in thought and style, is not without pathos, and gives an impression of sincerity. But the Rev. Urian Oakes himself was not so fortunate in his elegist, no less a person than the Rev. Cotton Mather, the most prolific elegist of his time. His elegy on Oakes reaches a length of over four hundred l
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
(N. P. Willis), 243 n. Self, 230 Self-Reliance, 336, 352 Sella, 263 n., 273, 281 Seneca, 116 Seneca Lake, 279 Sentiments of a British American, 127 Sertorius, the Roman patriot, 224 Seventy-six, 309 Sewall, Samuel, 48, 54 Shaftesbury, 93, 102, 109, I16 Shakespeare, 4, 12, 110, 112, 118, 211, 265 Sharpe, Colonel, 224 She would be a soldier, 220, 226 Shelburne, Lord, 91 Shelley, 261, 268, 274, 279, 290, 326, 346 Shenstone, 176, 178, 178 n. Shepard, Rev., Thomas, 153 Sheppard Lee, 311 Sherman, Roger, 148 Sherman, General W. T., 317 Shipley, Bishop, 91 Shippen, Joseph, 122 Shirley, Governor, 106 Sidney, Algernon, 105, i18 Sievers, 275 Sigismund of Transylvania, 18 Sigurd the Volsung, 261 Silence Dogood, 94, 113 Silsbee, Joshua, 227 Simms, W. G., 224 n., 231, 307, 308, 312-318, 319, 324 Simonides, 359 Simple Cobbler of Aggawam, the, 39 Sinners in the hands of an angry God, 60 Sir Charles Grandison,