Your search returned 114 results in 15 document sections:

1 2
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
imkins, Oloff Smith, Alexander H. Truett, Robert Brown, John H. James, Thomas Cripps, John Brazell, James H. Morgan, John Smith, James B. Chandler., William Jones, William Doolen, James Smith, Hugh Hamilton, James McIntosh, William M. Carr, Thomas Atkinson, David Sprowle, Andrew Miller, James Martin, William Phinney, John Smith, Samuel W. Kinnard, Patrick Dougherty, Michael Cassidy, George Taylor,,Louis G. Chaput, James Ward, Daniel Whitfield, John M. Burns, John Edwards, Adam McCulloch, James Sheridan, John E. Jones, William Gardner, John Preston, William Newland, David Naylor, Charles B. Woram, Thomas Kendrick, James S. Roan, tree, Andrew Jones, James Seanor, William C. Connor, Martin Howard, James Tallentine, Robert Graham, Henry Brutsche, Patrick Colbert, James Haley, John F. Bickford, Charles A. Read, William Smith, William Bond, Charles Moore, George H. Harrison, Thomas Perry, John Hayes, George E. Read, Robert Strahan, James H. Lee, Joachim Pease (colored), William B. Poole, Mic
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
below, after this accident, he cheerfully rendered assistance in carrying orders. The pilot, Mr. John V. Grivet, served part of the time on board the Galena, and part of the time on this ship. That part of his conduct which came under my observation merits praise. For the crew, they stood to their guns most nobly. Many deserve mention, but I shall only name those that came under my own observation. The following men are then honorably mentioned by Lieutenant Huntington: James Sheridan and John E. Jones, Quartermasters; William Gardner, Seaman; John Preston, Landsman; William Newland, Ordinary Seaman; David Nailor, Landsman; Charles Wooram, Ordinary Seaman; Thomas Kendrick, Coxswain. The marines conducted themselves with the usual distinguished gallantry of their corps. Sergeant James S. Roantree is particularly deserving of notice. Additional Reports of Captain T. A. Jenkins, commanding U. S. S. Richmond: Sir — I have the honor to report that in obedien
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
Engineers: Acting First Assistants, John H. Foster and T. B. Grene; Second-Assistant, L. T. Stafford; Third-Assistant, J. L. Hannum; Acting-Third-Assistant, Morris McCarty. Passaic--Third-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, T. Scott Fillebrown; Lieutenant, H. L. Johnson; Acting-Masters, A. A. Owens and Charles Cook; Acting-Ensigns, L. A. Waterman, Richard Hepburn and Sylvester Eldridge; Assistant Surgeon, Wm. P. Baird; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, F. A. Wheeler; Engineers: First-Assistant, James Sheridan; Second-Assistants, F. H. Fletcher, Webster Lane and Joseph Hooper; Acting-Third-Assistant, G. S. Odell. Montauk--Fourth-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, E. E. Stone; Lieutenant, E. F. Brower; Acting-Master, W. W. Crowningshields; Acting-Ensigns, G. W. Bourne, W. T. Mitchell and E. Gabrielson; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. B. Todd; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. A. Robbins; Engineers: Second-Assistants, A. Adamson and J. W. Hollihan; Acting-Second-Assistants, Simeon Rockburn and Charles
n merits praise. For the crew, they stood to their guns most nobly. Many deserve mention, but I shall only name those that came under my own observation. James Sheridan, Quartermaster, Captain of the after eleven-inch gun, was wounded in several places, but remained at his gun until the firing ceased, when he supplied the place of the Signal Quartermaster, who had been injured by a fall. Sheridan is very intelligent, understands the rudiments of navigation and the use of the sextant, and I recommend him to your favorable notice. John E. Jones, Quartermaster, stationed at the wheel, was also wounded. After the wheel-ropes were shot away he went on tireman, scalded; John Boyle, coal-heaver, scalded; Moses Jones, coal-heaver, scalded; John Ralton, landsman, scalded; Edward Thomas, ordinary seaman, scalded; James Sheridan, Quartermaster, contusion; John E. Jones, Quartermaster, contusion; Henry Binney, Quartermaster, contusion; Francis Brown, Quarter-Gunner, contusion; Christia
line, and passing in the rear of General Brannan. By this unfortunate mistake, a gap was opened in the line of battle, of which the enemy took instant advantage, and, striking Davis in the flank and rear, threw his whole division into confusion. General Wood claims that the orders he received were of such a character as to leave him no option but to obey them in the manner he did. Pouring in through this break in our line, the enemy cut off our right and right centre, and attacked Sheridan's division, which was advancing to the support of our left. After a gallant but fruitless effort against this rebel torrent, he was compelled to give way, but afterward rallied a considerable portion of his force, and by a circuitous route joined General Thomas, who now had to breast the tide of battle against the whole rebel army. Our right and part of the centre had been completely broken, and fled in confusion from the field, carrying with them to Chattanooga their commanders, Genera
nd Wood's, were formed in front of Fort Wood--Sheridan on the right, Wood on the left, with his leftwere immediately turned upon the enemy in General Sheridan's front. The rebel cannoneers good-natur left and a little to the rear, forming, with Sheridan's fine division, a second line of battle, whider to the right of Fort Wood, and in rear of Sheridan, might be considered a third line. Upon a knob near the centre of Sheridan's position, was placed a battery, which, together with the heavy arended to a lithe stream called Citico Creek. Sheridan had also moved up on the right of General Woohe left of General Granger's corps, (Wood and Sheridan;) and while Carl Schurz's division relieved Sations based upon his conduct at Chickamauga; Sheridan had sustained his excellent reputation; Howareme right; then Geary's; then Johnson's; then Sheridan's; then Wood's; then Baird's; then Schurz's; an instant Granger and Palmer hurled Wood and Sheridan down the slope of the ridge upon which they h[15 more...]
the Cumberland with glory. True, the fight was upon a comparatively small scale; but victories are not always to be valued by the numbers engaged, nor the list of the slain. The importance of an achievement must be estimated by results; and, in this instance, it would be impossible to compute the magnitude of the interests at stake, and the advantages gained by the defeat of our adversary. Although it has hitherto been contraband, I deem it so no longer, to state that the divisions of Sheridan and Wood were left at or near Knoxville, when Sherman withdrew from that point, and they will probably remain there during the winter; and, of course, it is necessary that their supply-trains, left behind at the first march, should be forwarded to them. Accordingly, a few days since, the quartermasters received orders to move their vehicles to their respective commands, and, in a brief space, the trains were on the way, guarded by the cavalry brigade commanded by Colonel Long, of the Fourt
Doc. 54.-fight near Dandridge, Tenn. camp near Strawberry Plains, East-Tennessee, January 19. Wood's division of Granger's corps drove the rebel cavalry out of Dandridge January fifteenth; Sheridan's division came up the sixteenth. There was sharp skirmishing the evening of the sixteenth, but the enemy was driven back. There was a tough fight Sunday, lasting from three o'clock P. M. till dark. La Grange's brigade of cavalry, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth, Ninety-third, and First Ohio infantry--One Hundred and Twenty-fifth commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Moore, Ninety-third and First by the major of the Ninety-third--were the forces chiefly engaged on our part. The infantry regiments were on picket; and the forces in the order from left to right as named above. In addition to this a section of a battery was posted on a hill in rear of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth. The rebels came on in strong force, five to one. The cavalry videttes were soon driven in; then the i
on's and Davis's divisions and one brigade of Sheridan's were heavily engaged on the nineteenth, Davs losing one brigade commander, (killed,) and Sheridan one, (wounded.) But I need not delay the CWilder's brigade of mounted infantry extended Sheridan's right, but the rest of the cavalry was not nding directs you to send two brigades of General Sheridan's division at once and with all possible as soon as your orders are given in regard to Sheridan's movement. Have you any news from Colonel PCleve was also marching. The two brigades of Sheridan's, which are in line on the right, are now ta] Laibolt, who had been held as a reserve for Sheridan, is now ordered to support General Davis's rillery and transportation. I knew that Generals Sheridan and Davis were in safety and with their at I had obeyed him and repeated his order to Sheridan, for that was the duty of a staff-officer, foral Davis should remain and hold the Gap; General Sheridan to pass through Rossville, toward General[5 more...]
ward, while a heavy demonstration was made on the front, as though he intended to force a passage over the road. The enemy were again deceived, and our forces fell back upon Okolona. This was on Monday, the fifteenth instant. The attack upon Okolona was so little expected that several confederate officers, at home on visit to their families, were captured. Some of them were finely mounted. The Ninth Illinois regiment of cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel Burgh commanding, was then sent out to Sheridan, to endeavor to secure a crossing of the Tombigbee. On the next morning, Hepburn's brigade, commanded by General Grierson in person, was sent out to support the Ninth regiment, and at Aberdeen, with directions to threaten Columbus strongly. With the remaining two brigades, General Smith swept down the railroad toward West-Point, tearing up the railroad completely as he advanced, and also burning all the corn he found. There were vast quantities of this, cribbed and ready for transportati
1 2