Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for P. H. Sheridan or search for P. H. Sheridan in all documents.

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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Headquarters moved to Memphis-on the road to Memphis-escaping Jackson-complaints and requests-halleck appointed commander-in-chief --return to Corinth — movements of Bragg- surrender of Clarksville — the advance upon Chattanooga-Sheridan Colonel of a Michigan regiment (search)
ht miles from Bolivar. On the 30th I learned from Colonel P. H. Sheridan, who had been far to the south, that Bragg in persinth when the troops reached that point, and found General P. H. Sheridan with them. I expressed surprise at seeing him andled at his desire to get away and did not detain him. Sheridan was a first lieutenant in the regiment in which I had serThere was no difficulty in getting supplies forward while Sheridan served in that capacity; but he got into difficulty with ted. When General Halleck took the field in April, 1862, Sheridan was assigned to duty on his staff. During the advance onwould appoint a good man without reference to his State. Sheridan was named; and was so conspicuously efficient that when C distinguished services in his new field. Granger and Sheridan reached Louisville before Buell got there, and on the night of their arrival Sheridan with his command threw up works around the railroad station for the defence of troops as they c
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Preparations for battle-thomas Carries the first line of the enemy-sherman Carries Missionary Ridge--battle of Lookout Mountain--General Hooker's fight (search)
would reach the nearer points of the enemy's line. On the morning of the 23d Thomas, according to instructions, moved [Gordon] Granger's corps of two divisions, Sheridan and T. J. Wood commanding, to the foot of Fort Wood, and formed them into line as if going on parade, Sheridan on the right, Wood to the left, extending to or nSheridan on the right, Wood to the left, extending to or near Citico Creek. Palmer, commanding the 14th corps, held that part of our line facing south and south-west. He supported Sheridan with one division ([Absalom] Baird's), while his other division under [Richard W.] Johnson remained in the trenches, under arms, ready to be moved to any point. Howard's corps was moved in rear of tSheridan with one division ([Absalom] Baird's), while his other division under [Richard W.] Johnson remained in the trenches, under arms, ready to be moved to any point. Howard's corps was moved in rear of the centre. The picket lines were within a few hundred yards of each other. At two o'clock in the afternoon all were ready to advance. By this time the clouds had lifted so that the enemy could see from his elevated position all that was going on. The signal for advance was given by a booming of cannon from Fort Wood and other p
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Battle of Chattanooga-a gallant charge-complete Rout of the enemy-pursuit of the Confederates--General Bragg--remarks on Chattanooga (search)
sault for his relief could not be delayed any longer. Sheridan's and Wood's divisions had been lying under arms from earincredibly short time loud cheering was heard, and he and Sheridan were driving the enemy's advance before them towards MissConfederate barriers at different points in front of both Sheridan's and Wood's divisions. The retreat of the enemy along m and thousands threw away their arms in their flight. Sheridan pushed forward until he reached the Chickamauga River at f the artillery and trains. It was now getting dark, but Sheridan, without halting on that account pushed his men forward ullery, wagon trains, and many prisoners in our hands. To Sheridan's prompt movement the Army of the Cumberland, and the nate ridge. Wood, who commanded the division to the left of Sheridan, accompanied his men on horseback in the charge, but did not join Sheridan in the pursuit. To the left, in Baird's front where Bragg's troops had massed against Sherman, the resist
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The military situation-plans for the campaign-sheridan assigned to command of the cavalry-flank movements-forrest at Fort Pillow-General Banks's expedition-colonel Mosby-an incident of the Wilderness campaign (search)
y so far in the war, and the belief that it was capable of accomplishing much more than it had done if under a thorough leader. I said I wanted the very best man in the army for that command. Halleck was present and spoke up, saying: How would Sheridan do? I replied: The very man I want. The President said I could have anybody I wanted. Sheridan was telegraphed for that day, and on his arrival was assigned to the command of the cavalry corps with the Army of the Potomac. This relieved GeneSheridan was telegraphed for that day, and on his arrival was assigned to the command of the cavalry corps with the Army of the Potomac. This relieved General Alfred Pleasonton. It was not a reflection on that officer, however, for I did not know but that he had been as efficient as any other cavalry commander. Banks in the Department of the Gulf was ordered to assemble all the troops he had at New Orleans in time to join in the general move, Mobile to be his objective. At this time I was not entirely decided as to whether I should move the Army of the Potomac by the right flank of the enemy, or by his left. Each plan presented advantage
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Commencement of the Grand campaign-general Butler's position-sheridan's first raid (search)
e operations of the centre, I will briefly mention Sheridan's first raid upon Lee's communications which, thound when we were moving on Spottsylvania I directed Sheridan verbally to cut loose from the Army of the Potomacdetour and an exhausting march, interposed between Sheridan and Richmond at Yellow Tavern, only about six miles north of the city. Sheridan destroyed the railroad and more supplies at Ashland, and on the 11th arrived innd some guns and many prisoners were captured. Sheridan passed through the outer defences of Richmond, andnd beaten by Wilson's and Gregg's divisions, while Sheridan turned to the left with the remaining division andps not engaged in bridge building. On the 13th Sheridan was at Bottom's Bridge, over the Chickahominy. Oned all the supplies he wanted to be furnished. Sheridan had left the Army of the Potomac at Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, in the vicinity of Chesterfield. Sheridan in this memorable raid passed entirely around Lee'
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's campaign in Georgia-siege of Atlanta --death of General McPherson-attempt to capture Andersonville-capture of Atlanta (search)
eir arduous campaign. The city of Atlanta was turned into a military base. The citizens were all compelled to leave. Sherman also very wisely prohibited the assembling of the army of sutlers and traders who always follow in the wake of an army in the field, if permitted to do so, from trading with the citizens and getting the money of the soldiers for articles of but little use to them, and for which they are made to pay most exorbitant prices. He limited the number of these traders to one for each of his three armies. The news of Sherman's success reached the North instantaneously, and set the country all aglow. This was the first great political campaign for the Republicans in their canvass of 1864. It was followed later by Sheridan's campaign in the Shenandoah Valley; and these two campaigns probably had more effect in settling the election of the following November than all the speeches, all the bonfires, and all the parading with banners and bands of music in the North.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
ree infantry and one cavalry corps, commanded respectively by Generals W. S. Hancock, G. K. Warren, John Sedgwick and P. H. Sheridan. The artillery was commanded by General Henry J. Hunt. This arm was in such abundance that the fourth of it could nrig.-Gen. Wm. H. Morris. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. T. Seymour. Artillery Brigade, Col. C. H. Tompkins. Maj.-Gen. P. H. Sheridan, commanding Cavalry Corps. First Division, Brig.Gen. A. T. A. Torbert. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. G. A. Custe commanded Hancock's left, and was ordered to attack, but was not able to accomplish much. On the morning of the 6th Sheridan was sent to connect with Hancock's left and attack the enemy's cavalry who were trying to get on our left and rear. He ated them at both places. Later he was attacked, and again the enemy was repulsed. Hancock heard the firing between Sheridan and Stuart, and thinking the enemy coming by that road, still further reinforced his position guarding the entrance to t
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, After the battle-telegraph and signal service- movement by the left flank (search)
ons. All the hospitals should be moved to-day to Chancellorsville. U. S. Grant, Lieut.-General During the 7th Sheridan had a fight with the rebel cavalry at Todd's Tavern, but routed them, thus opening the way for the troops that were to gdvance. We has passed but a little way beyond our left when the road forked. We looked to see, if we could, which road Sheridan had taken with his cavalry during the day. It seemed to be the right-hand one, and accordingly we took it. We had not go 7th-8th which he was ordered to commence on the morning of the 8th. But accident often decides the fate of battle. Sheridan's cavalry had had considerably fighting during the afternoon of the 7th, lasting at Todd's Tavern until after night, witholding the bridge over the Po River, which Lee's troops would have to cross to get to Spottsylvania. But Meade changed Sheridan's orders to Merritt — who was holding the bridge — on his arrival at Todd's Tavern, and thereby left the road free for A
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Battle of Spottsylvania-Hancock's position-assault of Warren's and Wright's corps-upton promoted on the field-good news from Butler and Sheridan (search)
Battle of Spottsylvania-Hancock's position-assault of Warren's and Wright's corps-upton promoted on the field-good news from Butler and Sheridan The Mattapony river is formed by the junction of the Mat, the Ta, the Po and the Ny rivers, the last being the northernmost of the four. It takes its rise about a mile south and a ld, and had whipped [D. H.] Hill, killing, wounding and capturing many. Also that he was intrenched, and could maintain himself. On this same day came news from Sheridan to the effect that he had destroyed ten miles of the railroad and telegraph between Lee and Richmond, one and a half million rations, and most of the medical stod Richmond, one and a half million rations, and most of the medical stores for his army. On the 8th I had directed Sheridan verbally to cut loose from the Army of the Potomac and pass around the left of Lee's army and attack his cavalry and communications, which was successfully executed in the manner I have already described.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Hancock's assault-losses of the Confederates- promotions recommended-discomfiture of the enemy-ewell's attack-reducing the artillery (search)
egraph south of Richmond on the Danville road: and the latter, the destruction of a depot of supplies at Dublin, West Virginia, and the breaking of New River Bridge on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. The next day news came from Sherman and Sheridan. Sherman had forced Johnston out of Dalton, Georgia, and was following him south. The report from Sheridan embraced his operations up to his passing the outer defences of Richmond. The prospect must now have been dismal in Richmond. The roadSheridan embraced his operations up to his passing the outer defences of Richmond. The prospect must now have been dismal in Richmond. The road and telegraph were cut between the capital and Lee. The roads and wires were cut in every direction from the rebel capital. Temporarily that city was cut off from all communication with the outside except by courier. This condition of affairs, however, was of but short duration. I wrote Halleck: Near Spottsylvania C. H., May 16, 1864, 8 A. M. Major-General Halleck, Washington, D. C. We have had five days of almost constant rain without any prospect yet of it clearing up. The roads hav
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