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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 28 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The failure to capture Hardee. (search)
asked for his presence. When he arrived in Charleston Sherman vas close to Savannah, the end of his march tes in that region for some effective action against Sherman. He telegraphed Hardee (December 8th), advising hiistance along which the railroad had been broken by Sherman near Savannah, my wagon and pair of horses being trlats collected, supposing they had been gathered by Sherman for the crossing of the river. But the work was pr concentrated on the Georgia bank of the river, General Sherman had gone in person around by the sea to Hilton ll escape from Savannah must have been cut off. General Sherman saw his mistake too late, and, in his letter ofl Foster. In his Memoirs, Vol. II., p. 216, General Sherman explains his action at this time as follows: the retreat of about 10,000 men. To estimate General Sherman's error we must here consider that the Confederin order to try a supreme and decisive blow against Sherman, and, if successful, then to concentrate all forces
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sherman's march from Savannah to Bentonville. (search)
Sherman's march from Savannah to Bentonville. by Henry W. Slocum, Major-General, U. S. V. General sherman's army commenced its march from Atlanta to the sea on the morning of November 15th, and t supply of food and ammunition, making this one of the happiest days experienced by the men of Sherman's army. Preparations were at once commenced for assaulting the Confederate works, and were neatered the city before daybreak on the 21st of December. The fall of Fort McAllister placed General Sherman in communication with General Grant and the authorities at Washington, Prior to the capture of Savannah, the plan contemplated by General Grant involved the removal of the infantry of Sherman's army to City Point by sea. On December 6th General Grant wrote to Sherman: My idea now is thSherman: My idea now is that you establish a base on the sea-coast, fortify, and leave all your artillery and cavalry and enough infantry to protect them, and at the same time so threaten the interior From a photograph. G