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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 74 0 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The relief of Knoxville-headquarters moved to Nashville-visiting Knoxville-cipher dispatches --Withholding orders (search)
cally restored me to my rightful position of General-in-Chief of the Army. But he soon lapsed again and took control much as before. After the relief of Knoxville Sherman had proposed to Burnside that he should go with him to drive Longstreet out of Tennessee; but Burnside assured him that with the troops which had been brought by Granger, and which were to be left, he would be amply prepared to dispose of Longstreet without availing himself of this offer. As before stated Sherman's command had left their camps north of the Tennessee, near Chattanooga, with two days rations in their haversacks, without coats or blankets, and without many wagons, expectf that time. The weather was now cold and they were suffering, but still they were ready to make the further sacrifice, had it been required, for the good of the cause which had brought them into service. Sherman, having accomplished the object for which he was sent, marched back leisurely to his old camp on the Tennessee River.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Operations in Mississippi-Longstreet in east Tennessee-commissioned Lieutenant-General-Commanding the armies of the United States-first interview with President Lincoln (search)
me 2,500 cavalry under General Sooy Smith to Sherman's department, and they had mostly arrived before Sherman got to Memphis. Hurlbut had 7,000 cavalry, and Sherman ordered him to reinforce Smith result was decidedly in Forrest's favor. Sherman had written a letter to Banks, proposing a cort, subject to my approval. I disapproved of Sherman's going himself, because I had other importantion of Mobile, presumably to operate against Sherman, and two more divisions to Longstreet in Easts. On the 2d of March, however, I learned of Sherman's success, which eased my mind very much. Thho had served with me in the West, mentioning Sherman specially, to take his place. If so, he beggurn to my old command in the West and to meet Sherman whom I had telegraphed to join me in Nashvillproaching campaign, and at the time I met General Sherman, it was expected that General Banks wouldd before him and ranked him in the old army. Sherman ranked him as a brigadier-general. All of th[20 more...]
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The military situation-plans for the campaign-sheridan assigned to command of the cavalry-flank movements-forrest at Fort Pillow-General Banks's expedition-colonel Mosby-an incident of the Wilderness campaign (search)
sacola in Florida. The balance of the Southern territory, an empire in extent, was still in the hands of the enemy. Sherman, who had succeeded me in the command of the military division of the Mississippi, commanded all the troops in the territe movable force about Chattanooga. His command was subdivided into four departments, but the commanders all reported to Sherman and were subject to his orders. This arrangement, however, insured the better protection of all lines of communication n, confronting the Army of the Potomac; the second, under General Joseph E. Johnston, was at Dalton, Georgia, opposed to Sherman who was still at Chattanooga. Beside these main armies the Confederates had to guard the Shenandoah Valley, a great stostorehouse, or inflict other little annoyances. Accordingly I arranged for a simultaneous movement all along the line. Sherman was to move from Chattanooga, Johnston's army and Atlanta being his objective points. [Private and Confidential.] Hea