hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for T. Sherman or search for T. Sherman in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
servative statesman that he had ever been, and was chosen by Governor Vance to accompany Governor Swain as an ambassador of peace to meet the incoming army of General Sherman. They surrendered the city of Raleigh to him and secured from him a promise of protection, which promise was, as a rule, observed. It was also through theirhis put an end to Southern supremacy and saved Missouri and Kentucky to the Union. Blair became a Major-General in the Union army and commanded the 17th corps on Sherman's march to the sea. Xi. University men and Confederate education. Such was the position of the alumni of the University in the field and in the legislative remained vigorous to the end. The public school was maintained in North Carolina throughout the war, except in those sections where the Federals had control, and Sherman's army on its entrance into Raleigh found Dr. Wiley at his desk receiving reports and tabulating statements on the condition of the schools. The position of Dr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lieut.-Colonel Francis W. Smith, C. S. A. (search)
re he graduated with first honors before he was eighteen. He took the course at the University of Virginia, but was interrupted in the second year by a long and severe attack of typhoid fever, and completed his education at the Ecole des Ponts et Chausees at Paris. On his return home, while still in his minority, he was unanimously elected to the chair of chemistry and geology and commandant of cadets at the State Military Seminary of Louisiana. There he was a colleague and friend of General Sherman, and remained so until Virginia seceded from the Union, when he promptly resigned and tendered his services to his native State. He was appointed captain in the provisional army of Virginia by Governor Letcher and immediately assigned to duty by General R. E. Lee, who took him on his personal staff as his military secretary. General Lee was at that time stationed in Richmond engaged in the work of organization. General Beauregard at Manassas made application for Captain Smith, as l
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
manifestations of enthusiasm. Even before the news of Lee's surrender reached Texas there had been signs of discontent apparent among some of the soldiers who were scattered in regimental and brigade camps principally throughout the southern and what was then the western part of the State—the section of greatest abundance of food supplies. While none openly admitted that the fall of the Confederacy was a possibility, many read in the march of Sheridan through the Valley of Virginia, of Sherman through Georgia, and in Lee's reverses the presage of coming disaster. In some regiments acts of open insubordination had been committed during the early spring. In one instance quite a number of cavalry took a furlough without leave, not deserting, but openly leaving with the avowed intention of visiting their families more than a hundred miles away, and of returning when it should suit their pleasure. They reached their homes, but were not permitted to remain, for their heroic and pa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
I reconnoitered close up to the Federal lines, captured prisoners from the enemy's pickets, and gained information of their position and the general conformation of the country. On March 10th, a Federal reconnoisance in force, commanded by General Sherman, advanced, and after driving in our pickets beyond Monterey, retreated rapidly to their camp near Shiloh Church. On April 3d General Johnston moved upon the enemy, and on the evening of April 5th the entire army was drawn up in two lines ays his force was too fatigued to pursue immediately. I remained on the field until dark, and then withdrew about three miles, and at midnight General Bragg gave me verbal instructions to hold that position. On the next morning, the 8th, Generals Sherman and Wood, each with a division, advanced, but, after feeling our lines, retired. I remained in the position close up to the enemy for about a week. and, with the exception of scouting parties, which approached our lines, the enemy remained
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Grant's censor. (search)
f Galena. The letter is dated: Before Vicksburg, Miss., June 6, 1863, 1 o'clock A. M., and reads: The great solicitude I feel for the safety of this army leads me to mention what I hoped never again to do—the subject of your drinking. This may surprise you, for I may be, and I trust I am, doing you an injustice by unfounded suspicion; but, if I am in error, it had better be on the side of this country's safety than in fear of offending a friend. I have heard that Dr. D——, at General Sherman's, a few days ago, induced you, notwithstanding your pledge to me, to take a glass of wine, and to-day, when I found a box of wine in front of your tent, and proposed to move it, which I did, I was told you had forbid its being taken away, for you intended to keep it until you entered Vicksburg, that you might have it for your friends, and tonight, when you should, because of the condition of your health, if nothing else, have been in bed, I find you where the wine-bottle has just been <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wounded at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
W. F. Armistrong, Company B, 14th Regiment, Alabama Infantry; died May 15, 1862. S. McCarley, Company I, 6th Regiment, Alabama Infantry; died May 25, 1862. H. J. Summerline, Company B, 14th Regiment, Alabama Infantry; died May 18, 1862. T. H. Moore, Company C, 10th Regiment, Alabama Infantry; died May 18, 1862. D. H. Woolley, Company C, 10th Regiment, Alabama Infantry; died August 14, 1862. G. M. Blackburn, Company B, 10th Regiment, Alabama Infantry; died May 27, 1862. T. Sherman, Company A, 2d Regiment, Florida; died——22, 1862. C. S. Fleming, Company B, 2d Regiment, Florida. S. J. Shapply, Company H, 18th Regiment, Mississippi; discharged. A. J. Bryan, Company I, 18th Regiment, Mississippi; discharged. N. S. Patterson, Company B, 18th Regiment, Mississippi; discharged from the residence of H. T. Jones; since dead. M. Tierney, Company C, 18th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry; discharged. William Baldridge, Company D, 18th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Story of a terrible battle. (search)
Story of a terrible battle. The carnage at Franklin, Tennessee, next to that of the Crater. S. A. Cunningham, editor of the Confederate Veteran, tells a story of his personal experience in the great battle of Franklin. It will be remembered that Hood had brought his army into Tennessee, while Sherman had gone on to the sea. Hood had almost succeeded in cutting off Schofield's forces at Columbia, having reached the vicinity of Spring Hill, between there and Franklin at night-fall of the day before the battle. No event of the war perhaps showed a scene equal to this charge at Franklin. The range of hills upon which we formed, offered the best view of the battlefield, with but little exposure to danger, and there were hundreds collected there as spectators. Our ranks were being extended rapidly to the right and left. In Franklin there was the utmost confusion. The enemy was greatly excited. We could see them running to and fro. Wagon-trains were being pressed across th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
es. It may be well to give a brief sketch of the Fayetteville Arsenal and Armory as a matter of historical record, touching the construction of the various buildings (as there is not a vestage of it left), having been totally destroyed by General Sherman on his famous march through the Carolinas. The Fayetteville Arsenal and Armory was located on what is known as Hay Mount, which overlooks the historic old city of Fayetteville, and was constructed by the United States Government previous tokeeper's office was William J. Woodward, who was placed in the ordnance department by Major Booth and General J. Gorgas, Chief of the Ordnance Bureau at Richmond, and he was one of the most efficient officers at the post. On the approach of General Sherman's army all work, of course, was suspended, and the entire command, after removing all the machinery possible, together with the large amount of supplies, were ordered in camp, and remained there until the surrender of Greensboro. Matthew P.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.56 (search)
n in the House, such as Charles Francis Adams, Thaddeus Stevens, Conkling, Bingham, Burlingame, Cox, Henry Winter Davis, Sherman, Lovejoy, Vance, Lamar, Sickles, Grow, Dawes and so on, the only living ones are Sherman, Sickles, Grow and Dawes, and oSherman, Sickles, Grow and Dawes, and of the combined membership of the House and Senate of that period, Sherman and Grow are the only ones who are in the roster of the current Congress. Clingman is alive, and that is all. His name will soon be added to the list of the dead, and then Sherman and Grow are the only ones who are in the roster of the current Congress. Clingman is alive, and that is all. His name will soon be added to the list of the dead, and then the Southern wing of that extraordinary Senate may be assembled complete in another world. Months ago Clingman disappeared from Washington, and even here there are a few who, if they were asked in regard to him, would not say that he is dead. The led to his rapid promotion to the rank of general. Let us make this a Thermopylae, said Clingman to Joe Johnston, when they were surrounded by Sherman's army. I am not in the Thermopylae business, retorted Johnston, and surrendered forthwith.