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John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 1,342 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 907 5 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 896 4 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 896 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 848 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 585 15 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 512 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 508 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 359 7 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 354 24 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William T. Sherman or search for William T. Sherman in all documents.

Your search returned 108 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
Raid, by Boynton, page 23.) Later on, General Sherman said: War is hell. If we could record hels should mount a horse at Atlanta and follow Sherman's route for fifty miles. He can hear stories wo councilmen of Atlanta, representing to General Sherman the frightful suffering that would be viss reply, can be found in the second volume of Sherman's Memoirs, at pages 124-5; we can only extracthe streets of Columbia after the Army of General Sherman had left. The original is still preservef this plundering! We can barely allude to Sherman's burning of Columbia, the proof of which is zation at the hands of this committee. General Sherman set out to make Georgia howl, and preferring of Columbia, General Hampton wrote to General Sherman, charging him with being responsible for But whilst no one will dispute the fact that Sherman has a clear title to the distinction we have hat Schofield had reached Goldsboro, and that Sherman was moving towards Cox's brigade, and that al[45 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
them and Judge Advocate-General Holt, and it gives pleasure and speaks well for human nature to note that whenever a gallant Union soldier had to deal with the matter of the treatment of a Confederate soldier or citizen, his tone was one of mercy, of justice, and of respect, without insult or harsh expressions, and with the utmost consideration for the defenceless, the weak, and the unfortunate. Every one knows this was characteristic of Grant, but the same may be well said of Sheridan, of Sherman, of Thomas, and of many others. The young Major-General who acted as jailor at Fortress Monroe is pehaps the most notable of the exceptions which prove this rule. Even in the case of General Miles it is fair to say his conduct resulted more perhaps from an intense desire to win the applause of his superiors—President Johnson, Mr. Stanton, Mr. Dana, and General Holt—than from the cruel nature which one might infer from his acts and correspondence. Many schemes of relief for Mr. Davis w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of Robert Edward Lee. (search)
verse after reverse had overtaken the Southern arms. The diversion of the Army of the West from Georgia to Tennessee had removed the last effective obstacle to Sherman's northern march, and that officer, with a column still formidable, was now moving with the inevitability of fate upon the rear of the last military reality of thinia, from which neither strategy nor assault, mining nor flanking, nor the policy of attrition, had served to drive the wasted legions of our great commander. Sherman's pathway, little impeded by the perfection of skill with which Johnson handled the skeleton force at his disposal, lay across the pleasant fields where dwelt thesouls, oh, who shall call the spirit weak that bore so much before it fell! For now the tale of ravaged lands, and the wails of suffering wife and children—for Sherman's triumphal progress left desolation in its wake—come on the southern breeze to men whose cup of ills had already overflowed. There is—must be—some boundary to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the history Committee (search)
ells of the deliberate burning of Atlanta, by Sherman's order, of the driving out from the city of onsideration. * * To this pathetic appeal, Sherman coolly replied on the next day, his letter cocrime, we now know from his own lips that General Sherman was a vandal But we also find, on page contrary. (It will be noted, however, that Sherman makes a distinction between his personal acts these, if uncontradicted, would bring on General Sherman and his army, and especially on the staff letter was not written by any officer in General Sherman's army. (This letter can be found in Volf this plundering! We can barely allude to Sherman's burning of Columbia, the proof of which is and robbery, and pretend it was by accident, Sherman replied on December 24, 1664, as follows: ing of Columbia, General Hampton wrote to General Sherman, charging him with being responsible for tten prior to the conduct of the armies under Sherman and Sheridan, some of which we have herein se[32 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
and men, it had inflicted a loss of more than fifty thousand upon the enemy in the campaign, resulting in Grant's change of base. But with inadequate supplies of food and clothing, it was then suffering all the discomforts and hardships of winter in the trenches around Petersburg and Richmond. Sheridan in the Valley of Virginia with a powerful and well-equipped army, had driven back Early with his little band of Confederates, and had completely devasted that beautiful and fertile region. Sherman, after destroying Atlanta and laying waste the surrounding country, was at Savannah with an army of sixty-five thousand men, prepared to march through the Carolinas and form a junction with Grant in Virginia. Such was the military situation when in the early part of January, 1865, Mr. Francis P. Blair, Sr., a gentleman of great ability and acknowledged influence with the Administration at Washington, made his appearance at Richmond. He brought with him no credentials, but exhibited to Mr.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
Their last battle. [from the Atlanta, Ga., Journal, July, 1901.] Fight at Bentonville, N. C., between Sherman and Johnston. Some personal observations. The soldiers among the pine trees and how they reserved their fire until the Federals were within easy Range— desperate struggle. I am gratified to see so many articles on the Close Call order since my first appeared. It may have inspired many old vets to relate their experiences, more or less thrilling in their nature, and some of which are truly historic and very entertaining. General C. A. Evans, in commending me for starting the ball in motion, and speaking of these articles as the rising cream of Confederate history, pleased me very much. We all must know that now is the time—a few years more it will be too late—to prepare and furnish such history, and the encouragement your most popular paper has given to the matter has been noticed all over the country. I learn with much pleasure that many are preserv<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
General Johnston desires you to make public the following orders: General orders no. 18.— headquarters army of Tennessee, near Greensboroa, N. C. April 27, 1865., By the terms of the military convention, made on the 26th, by Major-General W. T. Sherman, United States Army, the officers and men of this army bind themselves not to take up arms against the United States, until properly relieved from their obligations, and shall receive guarantees from the United States against molestatiamong our fellow-citizens and countrymen. Foraging will forthwith cease, and when necessity or long marches compel the taking of forage and provisions, or any kind of private property, compensation will be made on the spot; or when the disbursing officers are not provided with funds, vouchers will be given in proper form, payable at the nearest military depot. By order of Major-General W. T. Sherman. (Signed) L. M. Levton, A. A. G. (Signed) Archer Anderson, Lt. Col. and A. A. G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Nathan Bedford Forrest. (search)
ome of his remarkable achievements. Bishop Gailor, of Tennessee, contributes to the Sewanee Review for January, 1901, a very readable sketch of the military career of General Nathan Bedford Forrest, the Confederate cavalry leader, of whom General Sherman once wrote: After all, I think Forrest was the most remarkable man our civil war produced on either side. Forrest's first engagement, at Sacramento, Ky., illustrated the tactics that he followed with such marked success throughout the war party, and which Bishop Gailor characterizes as disgraceful, the next important action in which Forrest had a part was Shiloh, where he captured a battery, and on the retreat to Corinth he saved the Confederate army from destruction by checking Sherman's advance. Forrest's subsequent exploits are thus related by Bishop Gailor: Within three weeks, however, he was again ready for action, and made a raid into Middle Tennessee that astounded his enemies, and 22 so began the marvellous caree
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
. Reams' Station, Battle of. 289. Rehel, a term of honor, 130. Richmond, Fall of, April 3, 1865, 152 Socially during the war, 151; Light Dragoons, Roll of, 366. Sabine Pass, Notable Battle of, 314. Salem Church as Hospital, 171. Sanders, Colonel C. C, 172. Saunders, Hon. Romulus M., 33. St. Paul's Church, 154. Secession, Right of, 150. Seward, W. H., his little bell, 122, 190. Sharpsburg, Battle of, 307. Sheridan, General P. H., Vandalism of, 117. Sherman, General W. T., made war hell, 107, 280. Sherry, Sergeant, 9. Shiloh, Battle of, 357. Slaves, General Cleburne's plan to put into the army, 173; Extension of territory for 18. Squirrel Level Fort, 289. Stephens, A. H., his fidelity and acumen, 185. Stuart, General J. E. B., 169; how killed, 227, 335. Surratt, Mrs., Execution of, 122. Taylor, Governor Robert L., 361. Toney, Marcus B., 193 Toombs, General Robert 346. Torpedo boats, David, 292, Holland, of C. S. Navy, 293.