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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 536 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 446 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 161 19 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 155 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 118 2 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 46 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 42 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 31, 1865., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 3, 1865., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 30, 1864., [Electronic resource] 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for William Tecumseh Sherman or search for William Tecumseh Sherman in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 6 document sections:

Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
with him; but finally got him to the 6th Corps hospital, where I afterwards saw him, running round with some large instrument. I hope they didn't let him do much to the wounded. We were honored at dinner by the company of Governor Sprague and Sherman of the Senate. The Governor is a brisk, sparrowy little man with perky black eyes, which were shaded by an enormous straw hat. He is very courageous, and went riding about in various exposed spots. Sherman is the tallest and flattest of mortalSherman is the tallest and flattest of mortals — I mean physically. He is so flat you wonder where his lungs and other vitals may be placed. He seems a very moderate and sensible man. Tuesday, May 17.--Our Headquarters were moved to the left, and back of the Anderson house. We rode, in the morning, over, and staid some time at the house, one of the best I have seen in Virginia. It was a quite large place, built with a nest of out-houses in the southern style. They have a queer way of building on one thing after another, the great
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
merciful and civilized way, his correspondence is dignified and courteous, and his despatches are commonly (not always) frank and not exaggerated. General Meade got awfully mad, while waiting at the church. There came a cipher despatch from Sherman, in the West. Mr. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, hastened — with considerable want of tact — to read it to the General. Sherman therein told Grant that the Army of the West, having fought, could now afford to manoeuvre, and that, if his (GrSherman therein told Grant that the Army of the West, having fought, could now afford to manoeuvre, and that, if his (Grant's) inspiration could make the Army of the Potomac do its share, success would crown our efforts. The eyes of Major-General George Gordon Meade stood out about one inch as he said, in a voice like cutting an iron bar with a handsaw: Sir! I consider that despatch an insult to the Army I command and to me personally. The Army of the Potomac does not require General Grant's inspiration or anybody's else inspiration to make it fight! He did not get over it all day, and, at dinner, spoke of t
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
proved longer than he expected. For, shortly after his arrival in Beverly, where Mrs. Lyman was passing the summer, he had an attack of malaria which kept him in bed for some time. According to the doctors, The northern air, with the late cool change, had brought to the surface the malaria in the system. Consequently, he was not able to rejoin the army until the end of September. Meanwhile, the gloom was lifting, that had settled on the North after the failure to take Petersburg. For Sherman's capture of Atlanta, and Sheridan's victories over Early in the Shenandoah, had somewhat changed the situation, although the Army of the Potomac still lay before Petersburg, where it hovered for many weary months.] Headquarters, Army of Potomac September 28, 1864 It is late; I am somewhat tired and sleepy; I must be up early to-morrow, and many friends keep coming in to say How are you? So you will let me off from a long letter till to-morrow. It is as nat'ral as the hogs here. I h
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
and still clinging and meaning to cling; what would have become of Sherman and his great work? Sherman was just leaving Atlanta in his marSherman was just leaving Atlanta in his march to the sea. The record of General Meade is a remarkably clear one. He has risen from a brigadier of volunteers to all the higher commands he can handle 100,000 men and do it easy — a rare gift! Also, as Sherman and Sheridan, commanding the two other great armies, have been madave him promoted like the others. I believe it will turn out that Sherman is our first military genius, while Sheridan is most remarkable asing by flag of truce to Richmond. He had remained in Atlanta, and Sherman had told him if he wished to get back, he must go via Richmond. Fthey got a good deal of entertaining conversation. His opinion of Sherman was very high and complimentary. The old book tells us, he said, affairs are rather mixed up, you see. So are those of everybody. Sherman has disappeared in Georgia and nobody knows what awful strategy he
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
nville railroad, hoping to join Johnston, who was opposing Sherman's advance from the south. As a last resort, Lee planned tf the country will hardly permit it to either party. When Sherman gets, say, in the latitude of Weldon, if he does so withouression here seems to be, that the combined forces against Sherman are not very strong in the sum total, and are, of course, ling with fury and with all available troops, on a part of Sherman's army, or even on the whole of it, and dealing a stunningme, to my great surprise: I am going down to-morrow to see Sherman! Which, as I supposed Sherman to be at that moment somewhSherman to be at that moment somewhere near Goldsboroa, seemed a rather preposterous idea! At an early hour we got to Grant's Headquarters and found le monde norehead, he usually has a contracted back to his head; but Sherman has a swelling fighting back to his head, and all his featfeet high, with his sun-browned face and sailor air. I saw Sherman, Grant, Meade, and Sheridan, all together. A thing to spe
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
; death of, 107. Sentry, a patriotic, 206. Sergeant, William, 295. Seward, William Henry, 259. Seymour, Truman, 98, 299. Shaler, Alexander, 98. Shaw, Robert Gould, 257; death of, 1. Shaw, —, 134, 250, 285; described, 191. Shells, behavior of mortar, 261, 270. Sheridan, Philip, 136, 300, 332, 347; chief of cavalry, 81; described, 82, 327; Meade and, 105n, 271, 348; raids, 125, 320; to command, 210; major-general, 270; credit claimed, 351. Sherman, John, 115. Sherman, William Tecumseh, 271, 281, 296, 305; reflects on Army of the Potomac, 126; described, 327. Shot, behavior of round, 149. Sickles, Daniel Edgar, 60. Sleeper, Jacob Henry, 49, 225, 266; resigns, 310. Sleeping-car, 229. Slocum, Henry Warner, 22. Smith, William Farrar, 136, 137, 143, 160; described, 140; lunch, 148; before Petersburg, 161, 164n; Butler and, 192. Smyth, Henry Augustus, 275. Snyder, —, 72. Soldier, qualities of a great, 163. Spaulding, Ira, 311. Spaulding, —, 26. <