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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Sherman or search for Sherman in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The true story of the capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
in drawing up the terms of his celebrated capitulation to Sherman. The intelligence of this event caused the rebel chieftai in drawing up the terms of his celebrated capitulation to Sherman. On the contrary, he arrived at Greensboroa on the 12th oer, in full time to take part in the negotiations with General Sherman, which resulted, on the 18th, not in the final capitul quarter — from the headquarters of the Federal army.. General Sherman, in his Memoirs (pages 351-52), says that, in a confer the question whether, if Johnston made a point of it, he (Sherman) should assent to the escape from the country of the Confenston, in a note to his account of the negotiations, which Sherman pronounces quite accurate and correct, says General ShermaGeneral Sherman did not desire the arrest of these gentlemen. He was too acute not to foresee the embarrassment their capture would cause;the events of the period, there can be no doubt as to General Sherman's inclinations in the matter, if Johnston [had] made a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Grant as a soldier and Civilian. (search)
y of the United States and his successor, General Sherman, were so at variance, and yet carried botd acted on the principle, I never manoeuvre. Sherman never fought when he could avoid it, except aand force. After hearing him Grant called on Sherman to state his views, which was done with a flucal sketch of Grant, and which Grant wrote to Sherman when he was on the eve of going to assume comhat so erratic and undignified a character as Sherman's could have ever influenced Grant much; and plished, he was not allowed to return through Sherman's lines, but was required to go to City PointGrant himself was the real deus ex machina of Sherman's army while manceuvreing in front of Johnstoph he had free and instant communication with Sherman, and stated that every night they passed somece is plain that through all of that campaign Sherman had the benefit of Grant's advice at every stntry, occupied only by women and old men, and Sherman could go on and have his pleasure of the unpr[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notice. (search)
Book notice. Fitzhugh St. Clair, the S. C. Rebel boy, by Mrs. Sallie F. Chapin, of Charleston. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Hafflefinger. We are indebted to the accomplished authoress for a copy of this book, which we have read with deep interest. It is a well-laid plot and an admirably-told story of a noble South Carolina family whose head was killed in battle, and whose members had to struggle with the hardships of refugeeing, the brutality of Sherman's army when it captured Columbia, and the poverty and bitter trials into which so many of the best people of South Carolina were plunged by the pack of thieves who plundered the State at the close of the war. It shows how high character and Christian principle can resist temptation and win at last the reward of virtue, and holds up a model for the young men of the South which we could wish them all to read and imitate.