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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 461 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 40 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Frank T. Sherman or search for Frank T. Sherman in all documents.

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sturbed the railway track at all, and as we had captured a hand-car at Cowan, I thought I would have it brought up to the station near the University to carry me down the mountain to my camp, and, desiring company, I persuasively invited Colonel Frank T. Sherman to ride with me. I sent for the car by a courier, and for a long time patiently awaited its arrival, in fact, until all the returning troops had passed us, but still it did not come. Thinking it somewhat risky to remain at the station without protection, Sherman and myself started our horses to Cowan by our orderlies, and set out on foot to meet the car, trudging along down the track in momentary expectation of falling in with our private conveyance. We had not gone very far before night overtook us, and we then began to realize the dangers surrounding us, for there we were alone and helpless, tramping on in the darkness over an unknown railroad track in the enemy's country, liable on the one hand to go tumbling through some
th Mr. Lincoln and General Grant meeting General Sherman opposed to joining the Army of the Tennebelieved it foreshadowed my junction with General Sherman. Rawlins thought so too, as his vigorousct that my cavalry was not to ultimately join Sherman was a great relief to me, and after expressinhours. I should like to have you come down. Sherman's coming was a surprise-at least to me it was knowing the zeal and emphasis with which General Sherman would present his views, there again cameeltered the general-in-chief, I found him and Sherman still up talking over the problem whose solue next morning, while I was still in bed, General Sherman came to me and renewed the subject of my I had been assured that I was not to join General Sherman, it will be seen that the supplemental diions relative to the railroads and to joining Sherman; so early on the 29th I moved my cavalry out ederick C. Newhall, Adjutant-General. Colonel Frank T. Sherman, Inspector-General. Captain Andrew J.[6 more...]
nforced by the Fifth Corps battle of Five Forks turning the Confederate left an unqualified success relieving General Warren the Warren Court of inquiry General Sherman's opinion. The night of March 30 Merritt, with Devin's division and Davies's brigade, was camped on the Five Forks road about two miles in front of Dinwidde the assault at the return failed, he ran great risk of capture. Warren could not be found, so I then sent for Griffin-first by Colonel Newhall, and then by Colonel Sherman--to come to the aid of Ayres, who was now contending alone with that part of the enemy's infantry at the return. By this time Griffin had observed and apprecconditions existing to retain him longer. That I was justified in this is plain to all who are disposed to be fair-minded, so with the following extract from General Sherman's review of the proceedings of the Warren Court, and with which I am convinced the judgment of history will accord, I leave the subject: It would be an