hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 79 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Robert Sherman or search for Robert Sherman in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 9 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
tenant, Thomas B. Gregory; Acting-Ensign, N. T. Rennell; Acting-Master's Mate, J. S. Flint; Acting-Engineers, A. E. Giles, A. M. Smith and Robert Russell. Steamer great Western. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. F. Hamilton; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. S. Harvey; Acting Master, J. C. Little; Acting-Ensign, Richard Ellis; Acting-Master's Mates, L. F. Knapp and Richard Mitchell: Acting-Chief Engineer, Chas. Christopher; Engineers, Jos. Goodwin, B. A. Farmer and G. S. Baker; Acting-Gunner, Robert Sherman; Acting-Carpenter, Jos. Morton. Steamer judge Torrence. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, J. F. Richardson; Acting-Ensign, Jeremiah Irwin; Acting-Master's Mate, James Ross; Acting-Chief Engineer, P. R. Hartwig; Engineers, J. Stough, J. C. Barr and W. Y. Sedman. Steamer New Era. Acting-Master, F. W. Flammer; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Wm. B. Purdy: Acting-Ensigns, Wm. C. Hanford and Geo. L. Smith; Acting-Master's Mates, G. E. Cheever, W. C. Renner, W. B. Shillits and Wm. W
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
ung's Point. This was rather a desperate movement, but there was no other alternative. When Sherman first came down with the gunboats in company, he did not start out with the idea that he was toom not an officer of the expedition could put any confidence. McClernand had come to supersede Sherman in the Yazoo River just after the troops had fallen back to the transports, and he had accompanst, but with the express understanding with Admiral Porter that he would not interfere with General Sherman. This he refrained from doing until the enemy was beaten, and at that moment he assumed cohere were splendid generals in that Army, all men of the highest military acquirements, such as Sherman, McPherson, Steele and Smith, who now saw placed at their head an officer who had not only no q There was no use attempting to attack the place on either flank. The attempt had been made by Sherman at Chickasaw Bayou without effect, and since then that point had been made doubly secure agains
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 27: expedition through Steele's Bayou and Deer Creek. (search)
Confederates. a skirmish with tree cutters. Sherman marching to the relief of the gun-boats. dree Confederates attempt to capture the fleet. Sherman arrives. repulse of the Confederates. retref the naval part of the expedition, while General Sherman was to lead an army contingent of 8,000 ot had reigned there for a century or more. Sherman had arrived at Black Bayou with part of his fng kept prisoners on board by sharpshooters. Sherman's troops were not in sight and it became nece the fleet went on its way down rejoicing. Sherman had heard the firing, and had pushed on to gederates. They had fallen in with the head of Sherman's column, which was a great surprise to them, they broke and fled back to their steamers. Sherman arrived just in the nick of time. Whether thsoldiers as the men of that fleet were to see Sherman and his Army; and, as the gallant general rodat which all the divisional commanders,except Sherman and McClernand, were present. The plan pro[2 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 28: passage of the fleet by Vicksburg and capture of Grand Gulf.--capture of Alexandria, etc. (search)
, forty miles from the mouth of the river. Sherman remained with his division at Young's Point, g in that direction, the Admiral wrote to General Sherman, detailing the state of affairs and beggeMilliken's Bend, forty miles distant. It took Sherman twenty hours to get the dispatch to him, and y. General Grant had made arrangements for Sherman's division to make a feint up Yazoo River thettacked Grand Gulf. Accordingly, on that day Sherman moved up the Yazoo in transports preceeded byd get, opened a heavy fire on the works while Sherman disembarked his troops. There was but one enough for but four men to march abreast. As Sherman advanced along this road towards Haines' Blufpproaching from that direction. At dark, General Sherman re-embarked his men, having accomplished tion was considered of such importance by General Sherman, it was necessary to do everything that wirs. As it was, everything turned out to General Sherman's satisfaction, and returning to Young's
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
ksburg, July 4, 1863. meeting of the officers of the Army and Navy on board the flag-ship Black Hawk. letters from General Sherman to Admiral Porter. generous terms granted the besieged after the capture of Vicksburg. true history. harmony in Aushed up the river as near as she could get to the combatants, and it was soon discovered by the aid of glasses that General Sherman's division was coming in on the left of Snyder's Bluff, cutting off the enemy at that place from joining the troops he Yazoo to open communication with the Army. In three hours, letters were received by the Admiral from Generals Grant, Sherman and Steele, informing him of their complete success in driving General J. E. Johnston away with his Army of 40,000 men, ehind in hopes of carrying off a quantity of stores, but they were driven away by the DeKalb and were cut off by some of Sherman's command who had marched in that direction. The Confederates had been so completely surprised by the sudden appearan
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
d H. Sullivan. Tug Pansy. Acting-Ensign, D. C. Bowers; Acting-Master's Mate, S. Johnson; Acting-Second-Assistant Engineers, J. W. Lindsey and F. H. Majors. Steamer great Western (powder Vessel.) *Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. F. Hamilton; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Jos. S. Harvey; Acting-Master, J. C. Little; Acting-Ensign, Richard Ellis; Acting-Master's Mates, L. F. Knapp and R. Mitchell; Engineers, Chas. Christopher, Joseph Goodwin, B. A. Farmer and G. S. Baker; Acting-Gunner, Robert Sherman; Acting-Carpenter, Joseph Morton. Steamer * Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant J. F. Richardson; Acting-Ensign, Jeremiah Irwin; Acting-Master's Mate, James Ross; Engineers, P. R. Hartwig, J. Stough, John C. Barr and W. Y. Sedman. Mortar boats. Commanded by Gunner * Eugene Mack, afterwards by *Ensign Miller. Vessels employed at other points on the river (1863-5). Steamer Peosta (4th rate).--Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, T. E. Smith (1864). Steamer Kenwood (4th rate).
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
Acting-Master, D. P. Rosenmiller; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, H. C. Snibley; Acting-Third-Assistant, J. S. Willcoxson. Steamer great Western. Acting-Master, Thomas Bates; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. A. Warren; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Marshall; Acting-Ensigns, A. M. Rowland and P. R. Starr; Acting-Master's Mates, Richard Mitchell and L. M. Knapp; Engineers: Acting-Chief, C. H. Christopher; First-Assistant, Jos. Goodwin; Acting-Third-Assistant, Edward Lodge; Acting-Gunner, Robert Sherman. Steamer judge Torrence. Acting-Master, Jeremiah Irwin; Acting-Ensigns, Wm. Sill; Acting-Master's Mates, Edw. Perkins and Edwin Boyce; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Peter Hartwig; Acting-First-Assistants, W. Y. Sedman and S. L. Walkenshaw; Acting-Second-Assistants, Livingston Cook and Jasper Holman. Iron-clad steamer Carondelet. Acting-Master, James C. Gipson; Assistant-Surgeon, D. R. Bannon; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. G. Worden; Acting-Ensigns, Oliver Donaldson, S. D.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
ns on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. suppressing guerillas. gun-boats co-operating with Sherman in expedition to Meridian. silencing batteries at Liverpool. gun-boats damaged. pushing up tout accident, and the guerillas were taught a lesson they did not forget for some time. When Sherman was marching on Meridian, a naval expedition was fitted out under the command of Lieutenant-Com lost eight killed and twenty-two wounded in this attack. This expedition had the effect which Sherman desired, viz., to draw the enemy toward Yazoo River. The gun-boats and army transports pusheher a skirmish, in which the Confederates were defeated. The result of this expedition was, as Sherman had anticipated, the falling back of all the enemy's troops which had been scattered along the t-Commander Owen, as mentioned on a former occasion, to keep the Confederates from following in Sherman's rear, had, with the assistance of the Navy, occupied Yazoo City, which seemed to be an object
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
us railroads running from it to all parts of the South. After the fall of Port Hudson and Vicksburg, General Banks, in New Orleans, had at his disposal over 50,000 troops; and General Grant, at that time having in his mind the idea of sending Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea, had urgently requested the authorities at Washington to Chart showing the fleet, under Admiral Farragut, passing Fort Morgan, and the position of the Confederate forts and vessels; also, chart of Mobile Baylmaker, D. C. Brayton. [Note.--A more complete list cannot be obtained.] Winnebago. Commander, Thomas H. Stevens; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. T. Shankland; First-Assistant Engineer, John Purdy; Pilot, Wm. H. Wroten; Acting-Gunner, Robert Sherman. [Note.--A more complete list cannot be obtained.] Chickasaw. Lieutenant-Commander, Geo. H. Perkins; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, William Hamilton; Acting Master, E. D. Percy; Gunner, J. A. McDonald. [Note.--A more complete list canno