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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
with the difficulties which threatened the Union cause. The superannuated army officers, called by the administration to its councils, were altogether unequal to the emergency, and they led the government into many difficulties. When General W. T. Sherman declared that an army of two hundred thousand men was required to put down the rebellion, he was thought to be crazy; but the President's advisers discovered, ere the war had lasted a year, that Sherman had in no way exaggerated the diffiSherman had in no way exaggerated the difficulties of the situation. Whatever may have been the reason of the failure to send a larger army to occupy the Southern coast as soon as the necessary gunboats could be improvised to penetrate the inlets of that region, it is certain the movement was not made until too late, and the principal theatre of war had been transferred to other points, around which the contending forces gathered, leaving the coast to be taken care of by the Navy; a duty which, we think it will be admitted, the Navy
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
defense was moved farther South and was now established on the following points: Island No.10, Fort Pillow and Memphis on the Mississippi, a point in Tennessee near Pittsburg, and the town of Chattanooga. All of these points were strongly fortified and defended by large armies, thus closing up East Tennessee, and preventing our armies from marching southward. On the 15th of February, Gen. Grant was assigned to the new military district of West Tennessee, with limits undefined, and Gen. W. T. Sherman to the command of the district of Cairo. Grant commenced at once to concentrate his forces and make his dispositions to meet the new order of defense established by the Confederates. His first step was to send Gens. Wright and McClernand up to Pittsburg, while he remained himself at Savannah, superintending the organization of the new troops which were arriving from Missouri, and making preparations to advance towards Pittsburg Landing (Shiloh). The account of the famous battle
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
was a lull for a time. On the 29th, General W. T. Sherman signalled to the flag-ship, requestingCincinnati was prepared for the adventure. Sherman was under the impression that the enemy had miver to attack the small battery mentioned by Sherman, but as the vessel rounded to and opened her hio to the relief of our officers and men. Sherman wrote to the Admiral, deploring the loss of te also employed in firing upon such points as Sherman pointed out, where he thought it advantageouselt that this was the triumph of his life. Sherman was one of those whose absence was regretted r the prize which had been so hardly won, and Sherman had gone to show him that he must move his heut even while engaged on so important a duty, Sherman did not forget those of the Navy with whom heart, I remain, your friend and servant, W. T. Sherman, Major-General. Admiral D. D. Porter, Commmy s batteries and rifle-pits in front of General Sherman, and made them untenable. The mortar-b[4 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
the enclosed general order, which, with this letter, you will cause to be read to your command. I am, respectfully, etc., Gideon Welles. Flag-Officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. General order. Navy Department, November 13, 1861. The Department announces to the Navy and to the country its high gratification at the brilliant success of the combined Navy and Army forces, respectively commanded by Flag-officer S. F. Du-Pont and Brigadier-General W. T. Sherman, in the capture of Forts Walker and Beauregard, commanding the entrance of Port Royal harbor, South Carolina. To commemorate this signal victory, it is ordered that a national salute be fired from each Navy Yard at meridian on the day after the receipt of this order. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Flag-officer Dupont's report concerning the Marine battalion, Nov. 15. Flag-Ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, S. C., Nov. 15, 1861. Sir — I avail myself of the f
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
the enclosed general order, which, with this letter, you will cause to be read to your command. I am, respectfully, etc., Gideon Welles. Flag-Officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. General order. Navy Department, November 13, 1861. The Department announces to the Navy and to the country its high gratification at the brilliant success of the combined Navy and Army forces, respectively commanded by Flag-officer S. F. Du-Pont and Brigadier-General W. T. Sherman, in the capture of Forts Walker and Beauregard, commanding the entrance of Port Royal harbor, South Carolina. To commemorate this signal victory, it is ordered that a national salute be fired from each Navy Yard at meridian on the day after the receipt of this order. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Flag-officer Dupont's report concerning the Marine battalion, Nov. 15. Flag-Ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, S. C., Nov. 15, 1861. Sir — I avail myself of the f