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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 174 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 92 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 87 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 84 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 78 16 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 71 11 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 51 9 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 46 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Shields or search for Shields in all documents.

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om the similarity of uniform and the mean advantages above referred to taken by our unscrupulous foes. They pressed our left flank for several hours with terrible effect, but our men flinched not until their number had been so diminished by the well-aimed and steady volleys that they were compelled to give way for new regiments. The 7th and 8th Georgia regiments, commanded by the gallant and lamented Bartow, are said to have suffered heavily during the early part of the battle. Kemper's, Shields', and Pendleton's batteries were in this part of the field, and did fearful execution. I regret to be unable to name all the regiments engaged, in their order, not having succeeded in ascertaining their position. I am inclined to believe there was some mistake during the day in the delivery or execution of an order of Gen. Beauregard's respecting an attack on the enemy's rear, which was not effected. Between 2 and 3 o'clock large numbers of men were leaving the field, some of them woun
tone's 18th regiments of Mississippi volunteers, with two brass 6-pounder guns of Walton's battery, and one company of cavalry. Longstreet's brigade covered Blackburn's Ford, and consisted of Moore's 1st, Garland's 11th and Crose's 17th regiments Virginia volunteers, with two 6-pounder brass guns of Walton's battery. Bonham's brigade held the approaches to Mitchell's Ford; it was composed of Kershaw's 2d, Williams' 3d, Bacon's 7th and Cash's 8th regiments South Carolina volunteers; of Shields' and Del Kemper's batteries, and of Flood's, Radford's, Payne's, Ball's, Wickman's and Powell's companies of Virginia cavalry, under Col. Radford. Cocke's brigade held the Fords below and in vicinity of the Stone Bridge, and consisted of Wither's 18th, Lieutenant-Colonel Strange's 19th, and R. T. Preston's 28th regiments, with Latham's battery and one company of cavalry, Virginia volunteers. Evans held my left flank and protected the Stone Bridge crossing, with Sloane's 4th regiment S
Let there be no compromise, till the last traitor shall lay down his arms and sue for peace. Illinoians! we are soon to make a record for our State. Each State will be justly emulous to inscribe her name highest on the scroll of fame, which the historian of this war has already commenced to write. Shall not the star which answers to Illinois be brightest in the galaxy of the thirty-four? On many a field of glory she has written an imperishable record of her prowess, and while the names of her Hardin, her Bissell, her Shields, and her Baker, and the gallant men around them, remain, her fame is secure. Let us now send her proudest chivalry into the field, and do nothing to mar the glories already achieved. Let us raise an army, which, in numbers, discipline, and prowess, shall of itself be sufficient to sweep the last vestige of treason from the Mississippi Valley, and to bear our flag in triumph to the ends of the republic. Richard Yates, Governor and Commander-in-Chief.