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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William C. Shields or search for William C. Shields in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
Ed. H. McCrory, James H. McCown, Thomas P. McDowell, William W. McGuffin, S. R. McGuffin, Thomas P. McManama, Robert McNutt, David A. Ott, L. O'Brian, William Orenbaun, James H. Painter, A. J. Paul, W. D. Patterson, Wm. A. Patterson, John Patterson, S. D. Paxton, Jas. T. Paxton, Jas. P. Paxton, John Paxton, Wm. H. Paxton, James H. Paxton, Thomas Paxton, Sam. Patter, John Pearl, William Pugh, James H. Pugh, John W. Risk, James P. Risk, Dabney Ramsey, William H. Selvey, Franklin Shewey, William C. Shields, Franklin Shaver, Cooke Sloan, Alfred F. Sly, Adolphus Sly, William A. Smiley, John B. Smiley, Joseph Sorrels, Geo. Sorrels, James E. Steele, Arch. W. Strickler, J. Ed. Taylor, Joseph Taylor, George W. Taylor, William P. Templeton, Benjamin Templeton, Job Thorn, R. R. Tribbett, F. M. Tribbett, Matthew Vess, C. D. Vess, Albright Wallace, Ed. Wallace, J. W. Wallace, George White, Robert White, I. M. White, John White, J. W. Whitesel, E. M. Wiseman, James A. Wine, John A. Wilson, S. W. W
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
her? asked the officer. Oh, she said, No man's lips shall ever again drink from that pitcher. Blessed the child. Again, while marching on to some new victory, he halted by a farm-house, whence a young mother came out into the road, with her young child in her arms, and said: General, won't you bless my child? He took the little infant in his arms, and reverently raising it, with uncovered head, prayed for God's blessing upon it. In the battle of Kernstown he was worsted by General Shields (one of the noblest of the Federal commanders). Because of the Confederates' ammunition being all exhausted, General Dick Garnett withdrew his troops. Jackson arrested Garnett, one of the truest and highest gentlemen in our army, and held him in arrest until Garnett, by personal influence, procured a trial by court-martial. Jackson was the principal witness for the prosecution. The court acquitted Garnett, after hearing Jackson's testimony, and only permitted the defence to be spread